The next chapter in The Conjuring universe.

Several years after the tragic death of their little girl, a dollmaker and his wife welcome a nun and several girls from a shuttered orphanage into their home, soon becoming the target of the dollmaker's possessed creation, Annabelle.

  • Pre-show and trailers run for approximately 20 minutes before the movie starts.1 hr 49 minR
  • Horror
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The Devilish Doll Returns

Terror takes over again in ANNABELLE: CREATION. Go back to the beginning, before Annabelle entered the doll and her presence grew from small to scary. Play the clip and get your tickets now.

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Why Annabelle: Creation Deserves Awards Too

Horror movies like 'Annabelle: Creation' are worthy of award consideration but are typically overlooked year after year, but why?

Cast & Crew

  • ANTHONY LAPAGLIA

    ANTHONY LAPAGLIASamuel Mullins

    Anthony LaPaglia was born on January 31, 1959 in Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. He is an actor and producer, known for Without a Trace (2002), Lantana (2001) and So I Married an Axe Murderer (1993). He was previously married to Gia Carides.
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  • Miranda Otto

    Miranda OttoEsther Mullins

    Miranda Otto is an Australian actress. Otto is a daughter of actors Barry Otto and Lindsay Otto, and half-sister of actress Gracie Otto. She began her acting career at age 18 in 1986, and has appeared in a variety of independent and major studio films. Otto made her major film debut in Emma's War (1987), in which she played a teenager who moves to Australia's bush country during World War II. After a decade of critically acclaimed roles in Australian films, Otto gained Hollywood's attention during the 1990s after appearing in supporting roles in the films The Thin Red Line (1998) and What Lies Beneath (2000). She played Éowyn in the second and third installments of Peter Jackson's The Lord of the Rings film series. Otto's first post-graduation film role in 1991, as Nell Tiscowitz in The Girl Who Came Late (1992), was her breakthrough role, which brought her to the attention of the Australian film industry and the general public. In the film, directed by Kathy Mueller, she starred as a young woman who could communicate with horses. Her appearance garnered Otto her first Australian Film Institute nomination for Best Actress the following year. Otto's next role was in the film The Last Days of Chez Nous (1992), which portrayed the complex relationships between the members of an Australian family. The film earned Otto her second Australian Film Institute nomination, this time for Best Supporting Actress. In 1993, Otto co-starred with Noah Taylor in the sexually provocative comedy film The Nostradamus Kid (1993), which was based on the memories of author Bob Ellis during the 1960s. Otto was drawn to the film because she was "fascinated by the period and the people who came out of it." A small role in the independent film Sex Is a Four Letter Word (1995) followed in 1995. In 1995, she began to doubt her career choice as she failed to get the parts for which she auditioned. She fled to her home in Newcastle for almost a year, during which she painted her mother's house. In 1996, director Shirley Barrett cast Otto as a shy waitress in the film Love Serenade (1996). She played Dimity Hurley, a lonely young woman, who competes with her older sister Vicki-Ann for the attention of a famous DJ from Brisbane. She starred in the 1997 films The Well (1997) and Doing Time for Patsy Cline (1997). When Otto received the film script for The Well, she refused to read it, fearing that she would not get the part. Otto believed that she could not convincingly play the role of Katherine, who is supposed to be 18, as she was 30 at the time. The film, directed by Samantha Lang, starred Otto as a teenager involved in a claustrophobic relationship with a lonely older woman. The Well received mixed reviews; critic Paul Fisher wrote that Otto's performance was not "convincing" as she was "playing another repetitious character about whom little is revealed", while Louise Keller stated that Otto had delivered "her best screen performance yet." Otto earned her third Australian Film Institute nomination for the film. Later that year, she co-starred with Richard Roxburgh in the drama Doing Time for Patsy Cline. The low-budget Australian film required Otto to perform country music standards and also received mixed reviews from film critics. Soon after the release of The Well and Doing Time for Patsy Cline, magazines and other media outlets were eager to profile the actress. In 1997, Otto began dating her Doing Time for Patsy Cline co-star Richard Roxburgh. Her involvement with Roxburgh made her a regular subject of Australian tabloid magazines and media at the time, a role to which she was unaccustomed. Otto's next project was the romantic comedy Dead Letter Office (1998). The film was Otto's first with her father, Barry, who makes a brief appearance. In the Winter Dark (1998), directed by James Bogle, followed later that year. Otto played Ronnie, a pregnant woman recently abandoned by her boyfriend. The film was a critical success in Australia, and Otto was nominated for her fourth Australian Film Institute Award. A small role in The Thin Red Line, led to further film roles outside of Australia, such as in Italy, where she co-starred as Ruth in the low-budget Italian film The Three-Legged Fox (2004), produced in 2001 and broadcast for the first time on Italian television in March 2009. Otto's first Hollywood role was opposite Harrison Ford and Michelle Pfeiffer in the suspense thriller What Lies Beneath in 2000. She played Mary Feur, a mysterious next-door neighbor. The film was met with mixed reviews, but was an international success, grossing US$291 million. In 2001, she was cast as a naturalist in the comedy Human Nature (2001). Writer Charlie Kaufman, impressed by her audition two years earlier for his film Being John Malkovich (1999), arranged for Otto to audition and meet with the film's director Michel Gondry. Human Nature was both a commercial and critical disappointment. Otto made her theatrical debut in the 1986 production of The Bitter Tears of Petra Von Kant for the Sydney Theatre Company. Three more theatrical productions for the Sydney Theatre Company followed in the late 1980s and early 1990s. In 2002, she returned to the stage playing Nora Helmer in A Doll's House opposite her future husband Peter O'Brien. Otto's performance earned her a 2003 Helpmann Award nomination and the MO Award for "Best Female Actor in a Play". Her next stage role was in the psychological thriller Boy Gets Girl (2005), in which she played Theresa, a journalist for a New York magazine. Otto committed to the project days before she found out she was pregnant. Robyn Nevin, the director, rescheduled the production from December 2004 to September 2005 so Otto could appear in it. In 2005, Nevin began pre-production on a play commissioned especially for Otto.
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  • BRIAN HOWE

    BRIAN HOWEPete Higgins

    Brian Howe is an actor, known for The Newsroom (2012), The Pursuit of Happyness (2006) and Westworld (2016).
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  • STEPHANIE SIGMAN

    STEPHANIE SIGMANSister Charlotte

    Stephanie Sigman is a Mexican-American actress. Her breakthrough role was in the 2011 crime drama film Miss Bala. She has gone on to appear in Pioneer (2013), Spectre (2015), Going Under (2016), and Annabelle: Creation (2017). On television, Sigman starred as Valeria Vélez in the first and second seasons of Netflix crime thriller, Narcos (2015). Sigman was born in Ciudad Obregón, Sonora, Mexico, to a Mexican mother and an American father, Lee Sigman, a New York Yankees scout from Kansas. She is a U.S. citizen through her father. Sigman began her career appearing on Mexican television, before making her film debut in Rio de Oro. In 2011, she played the leading role of Laura Guerrero in the Mexican crime drama film, Miss Bala. The film was selected as the Mexican entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 84th Academy Awards, but it did not make the final shortlist. Sigman was nominated for a Dublin Film Critics' Circle Award in 2011 for her performance in film. The following year, she played Catalina Aguado in the Canadian documentary film Flight of the Butterflies. In 2013, Sigman co-starred in the Norwegian thriller Pioneer. In 2013, Sigman played the leading role in the USA Network drama pilot The Arrangement opposite Bryan Greenberg. It not was ordered to series. Later that year, she was cast in a recurring role on the FX crime drama series, The Bridge. She also starred in the Arctic Monkeys music video for "Snap Out of It" in 2014. In 2015, Sigman played Valeria Vélez, character based on Virginia Vallejo, in the Netflix crime thriller, Narcos. In 2015, Sigman appeared in the James Bond film, Spectre, becoming the second Mexican actress to play a Bond girl after Linda Christian first played the role of Valerie Mathis in the 1954 TV adaptation of Casino Royale. She later was cast as a female lead in the action comedy Going Under, and well as War on Everyone. In 2016, Sigman had a recurring role as Monica Ava during the second season of the ABC anthology drama series, American Crime created by John Ridley. Ridley later cast Sigman in the leading role as Presence Foster, the former Army veteran who finds herself as unlicensed Private Investigator, in the ABC detective drama pilot, Presence. In 2017, Sigman began playing Jessica Cortez, captain and commanding officer of the LAPD Metropolitan Division in S.W.A.T.. Sigman starred as Sister Charlotte in Annabelle: Creation, opposite Miranda Otto. The horror film was released on 11 August 2017.
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  • ALICIA VELA-BAILEY

    ALICIA VELA-BAILEYEvil Mullins/Demon Hands

    As the most inspirational and diverse action actor of recent years, Alicia Vela-Bailey has emerged from A list stunt double to on screen sensation. Whether it is her chilling performance as Diana in the smash hit "Lights Out" or her acrobatic, ass kicking, portrayal of Alisha Whitley on Marvel's Agents of Shield, it is clear Alicia Vela-Bailey truly is the human special effect. Vela-Bailey was raised in Kailua, on the beautiful island of Oahu, Hawaii. Her mother Cecelia was a ballerina and an artist from North Carolina. Her father Carlos Armando, was a top magician from El Salvador. Having two artistic parents, Vela-Bailey was enrolled in gymnastics and dance at a very young age and quickly climbed the ranks of the Hawaiian Island Twisters, becoming a competitive Level 9 Gymnast. Later, Vela-Bailey shifted more of her focus to dance, becoming a member of Marcelo Pacleb's famous 24-VII Danceforce. At age 21, Vela-Bailey auditioned to double for Milla Jovovich in the film "Ultraviolet," and subsequently spent four months in Hong Kong and two months in Shanghai doing stunts and martial arts for the film. Ultraviolet was her very first movie experience, as well as her first time doing stunts and martial arts. Her performance earned two nominations for a Taurus World Stunt Award in 2007. Vela-Bailey has continued doubling Hollywood's hottest stars including Charilze Theron, Jennifer Lawrence, and Kate Beckinsale to name a few. As a dancer, Vela-Bailey booked her very first audition and she became a Pussycat Doll in Las Vegas at Caesar's Palace, before being called to audition for James Cameron's Oscar® winning feature film Avatar. She spent 3 years working on the groundbreaking film as Zoe Saldana's stunt double for the character of Neytiri, as well as playing many different Navi characters including her own character as the Ikran Clan Leader. Making her way in front of camera in recent years, Vela-Bailey landed the role of Inhuman Alisha Whitley on ABC's hit show "Marvel's Agents of Shield." Having the ability to act and do her own stunts has quickly helped Vela-Bailey become a fan favorite over the last 2 seasons. The fan dubbed "Ginger Ninja" uses her ability to multiply to take on whatever the Marvel Universe throws at her. Being a huge fan of the horror genre, Vela-Bailey takes pride in scaring the "bejesus" out of people. Her terrifying performances in "The Purge" as the Female Freak and the leather clad Cyber Punk in "Hostel 3" feature Vela-Bailey's unique ability to manipulate her body to create terrifying movement. This character work caught the eye of director David Sandberg and horror super producer James Wan, who were having trouble finding the correct portrayal for the lead villain Diana in "Lights Out." Blown away by Vela-Bailey's audition, they hired her on the spot and Vela-Bailey created the performance of Diana that had New York Times' Jeannette Catsoulis say "Lights Out delivers frights in old-school ways. Chief among these are the chilling exertions of Alicia Vela-Bailey, who portrays Diana with limber ingenuity. She imbues the spook with devilish intent. Whatever you do, don't blink." Recently Vela-Bailey has just finished Doubling Gal Gadot on Wonder Women and is collaborating again with David Sandberg and James Wan on "Annabelle 2" as the evil Mrs. Mullins.
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  • David Sandberg

    David SandbergDirector

Cast & Crew photos provided by TMDb.

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