The most dangerous mission in history

On the heels of their six-time Academy Award-winning smash, La La Land, Oscar-winning director Damien Chazelle and star Ryan Gosling reteam for Universal Pictures' FIRST MAN, the riveting story of NASA's mission to land a man on the moon, focusing on Neil Armstrong and the years 1961-1969. A visceral, first-person account, based on the book by James R. Hansen, the movie will explore the sacrifices and the cost--on Armstrong and on the nation--of one of the most dangerous missions in history.

  • 2 hr 21 minPG13HDSD
  • Oct 12, 2018
  • Drama

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See FIRST MAN on the Biggest Screen

After screening the docu-drama in IMAX at TIFF, we suggest you experience FIRST MAN on the biggest screen possible. Hear our first thoughts of the film, which will likely join the Oscar race.

Cast & Crew

  • Ryan GoslingNeil Armstrong

    Canadian actor Ryan Gosling is the first person born in the 1980s to have been nominated for the Best Actor Oscar (for Half Nelson (2006)). He was born Ryan Thomas Gosling on November 12, 1980, in London, Ontario, Canada. He is the son of Donna (Wilson), a secretary, and Thomas Ray Gosling, a traveling salesman. Ryan was the second of their two children, with an older sister, Mandi. His ancestry is French-Canadian, as well as English, Scottish, and Irish. The Gosling family moved to Cornwall, Ontario, where Ryan grew up and was home-schooled by his mother and also attended Gladstone Public School. Ryan attended Cornwall Collegiate and Vocational High School in Cornwall, where he excelled in Drama and Fine Arts. The family then relocated to Burlington, Ontario, where Ryan attended Lester B. Pearson High School. Ryan first performed as a singer at talent contests with Mandi. He attended an open audition in Montreal for the TV series "The Mickey Mouse Club" (The All New Mickey Mouse Club (1989)) in January 1993 and beat out 17,000 other aspiring actors for a a spot on the show. While appearing on "MMC" for two years, he lived with co-star Justin Timberlake's family. Though he received no formal acting training, after "MMC," Gosling segued into an acting career, appearing on the TV series Young Hercules (1998) and Breaker High (1997), as well as the films The Slaughter Rule (2002), Murder by Numbers (2002), and Remember the Titans (2000). He first attracted serious critical attention with his performance as the Jewish neo-Nazi in the controversial film The Believer (2001), which won the Grand Jury Prize at the 2001 Sundance Film Festival. He was cast in the part by writer-director Henry Bean, who believed that Gosling's strict upbringing gave him the insight to understand the character Danny, whose obsessiveness with the Judaism he was born into turns to hatred. He was nominated for an Independent Spirit Award as Best Male Lead in 2002 for the role and won the Golden Aries award from the Russian Guild of Film Critics. After appearing in the sleeper The Notebook (2004) in 2004, Gosling won the dubious honor of being named one of the 50 Hottest Bachelors by People Magazine. More significantly, he was named the Male Star of Tomorrow at the 2004 Show West convention of movie exhibitors. Gosling reached a summit of his profession with his performance in Half Nelson (2006), which garnered him an Academy Award nomination as Best Actor. In a short time, he has established himself as one of the finest actors of his generation. Throughout the subsequent decade, he has become all three of an internet fixation, a box office star, and a critical darling, having headlined Blue Valentine (2010), Crazy, Stupid, Love (2011), Drive (2011), The Ides of March (2011), The Place Beyond the Pines (2012), The Nice Guys (2016), and La La Land (2016). In 2017, he starred in the long-awaited science fiction sequel Blade Runner 2049 (2017), with Harrison Ford. Ryan has two children with his partner, actress Eva Mendes.
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  • Claire FoyJanet Armstrong

    Claire Elizabeth Foy (born 16 April 1984) is an English actress. She studied acting at the Liverpool John Moores University and the Oxford School of Drama and made her screen debut in the pilot of the supernatural comedy series Being Human, in 2008. Following her professional stage debut at the Royal National Theatre, she played the title role in the BBC One miniseries Little Dorrit (2008), and made her film debut in the American historical fantasy drama Season of the Witch (2011). Following leading roles in the television series The Promise (2011) and Crossbones (2014), Foy received praise for portraying the ill-fated queen Anne Boleyn in the miniseries Wolf Hall (2015). Foy gained international recognition for portraying the young Queen Elizabeth II in the first two seasons of the Netflix series The Crown (2016-2017), for which she won a Golden Globe and a Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series, among other awards. In 2018, she starred in Steven Soderbergh's psychological thriller Unsane and portrayed Janet Shearon, wife of astronaut Neil Armstrong, in Damien Chazelle's biopic First Man. For the latter, she was nominated for the BAFTA and Golden Globe for Best Supporting Actress. Foy was born in Stockport. She has said that her mother, Caroline, comes from "a massive Irish family". Her maternal grandparents were from Dublin and Kildare, respectively. She grew up in Manchester and Leeds, the youngest of three children. Her family later moved to Longwick, Buckinghamshire, for her father's job as a salesman for Rank Xerox. Her parents divorced when she was eight. Foy attended Aylesbury High School, a girls' grammar school, from the age of twelve; she then attended Liverpool John Moores University, studying drama and screen studies. She also trained in a one-year course at the Oxford School of Drama. She graduated in 2007 and moved to Peckham to share a house "with five friends from drama school".
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  • Corey StollBuzz Aldrin

    Corey Stoll was born on March 14, 1976 in New York City, New York, USA as Corey Daniel Stoll. He is an actor, known for Midnight in Paris (2011), Ant-Man (2015) and House of Cards (2013). He has been married to Nadia Bowers since June 21, 2015. They have one child.
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  • Brian D'Arcy JamesJoe Walker

    Brian d'Arcy James was born on June 29, 1968 in Saginaw, Michigan, USA. He is an actor, known for Spotlight (2015), Shrek the Musical (2013) and Friends with Kids (2011).
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  • Christopher AbbottDave Scott

    Christopher Abbott is an actor, known for James White (2015), It Comes at Night (2017) and Whiskey Tango Foxtrot (2016).
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  • Cory Michael SmithRoger Chaffee

    Cory Michael Smith is an actor and producer, known for 1985 (2018), Gotham (2014) and Carol (2015).
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  • Pablo SchreiberJames Lovell

    Pablo Tell Schreiber was born in Ymir, British Columbia, Canada, to Lorraine Reaveley, a Canadian psychotherapist, and Tell Schreiber, an American actor. His paternal half-brother is actor Liev Schreiber. Pablo, who is named after Chilean poet Pablo Neruda, was raised in Ymir, and moved to Seattle, Washington, as a teenager. Pablo Schreiber was nominated for a Tony Award for his Broadway debut performance in the revival of Clifford Odets' classic Awake and Sing! directed by Bartlett Sher. Schreiber has appeared in many films, including: Josh Radnor's Happythankyoumoreplease (2010), which won the Audience Award at Sundance, Vicky Cristina Barcelona (2008), Lords of Dogtown (2005), Tell Tale (2009), Nights in Rodanthe (2008), The Manchurian Candidate (2004), Allegiance (2012), Breaking Upwards (2009), Into the Fire (2005), The Mudge Boy (2003) and Invitation to a Suicide (2004). Upcoming he appears in the independent features Fort Bliss (2014), The Dramatics: A Comedy (2015) and Preservation (2014). Television credits include his classic role as "Nick Sobolka" in HBO's critically acclaimed The Wire (2002); and most recently as the menacing villain "William Lewis" on Law & Order: Special Victims Unit (1999), NBC's "Ironside" and as "Pornstache" in Jenji Kohan's hit series Orange Is the New Black (2013). He's also appeared in Stephen Frears' Muhammad Ali's Greatest Fight (2013) for HBO and on Weeds (2005), A Gifted Man (2011), Lights Out (2011), The Good Wife (2009), White Collar (2009), The Beast (2009), Life on Mars (2008), It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia (2005), Fear Itself (2008), Dirt (2007), John Grisham's A Painted House (2003), Law & Order (1990), Law & Order: Criminal Intent (2001), and The Black Donnellys (2007). Schreiber has performed in numerous Broadway and off-Broadway plays including: Desire Under the Elms on Broadway directed by Robert Falls, Rajiv Joseph's Gruesome Playground Injuries at Second Stage, Neil LaBute's Reasons to be Pretty at MCC (for which he won the Drama Desk Award), Dying City at Lincoln Center, Mr. Marmalade at Roundabout, Sin: A Cardinal Deposed at The New Group, Manuscript at the Daryl Roth Theatre, Julius Caesar at the New York Shakespeare Festival, and Blood Orange, his professional debut.
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  • Patrick FugitElliot See

    Patrick Fugit was born in Salt Lake City, Utah, to Jan Clark-Fugit, a dance teacher, and Bruce Fugit, an electrical engineer. He has two siblings. He began acting in a summer Theater program through the University of Utah at eleven. He continued on through high school and regional productions. He enjoys biking and skating. In 2002, he was featured in Seventeen magazine, along with Alison Lohman, his co-star from White Oleander (2002).
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  • Ethan EmbryPete Conrad

    Ethan Embry was born Ethan Philan Randall on June 13, 1978 in Huntington Beach, California, to Karen and Charles Randall. Before he started acting in movies, Ethan appeared in more than 100 TV and Radio commercials. In 1991, at the age of thirteen, he appeared in three films and has continued acting ever since. On average, Ethan released or filmed at least two films per year, which continued up until 1999, when he filmed about five films. Ethan spent most of his childhood in Southern California, growing up with his older brother, Aaron (said to be one of the best musicians in LA), and his little sister, Kessia. In 1998, he bought a home of his own. In the Fall of 1999, Ethan co-starred as Sebastian in the short-lived CBS sitcom Work with Me (1999). Sadly, due to lack of ratings, the show ended after only four episodes. 1999, however, did bring a happy event, Ethan's then-wife, Amelinda Smith, gave birth to their first child, whom they named Cogeian, after the Latin word "cogeo," which means "to think over." In the fall of 2000, Ethan starred as Derek Barnes in FreakyLinks (2000) on Fox. Thirteen episodes were shot, but the series was soon canceled after its debut. Later success include a role as detective Frank Smith on Dick Wolf's remake of the classic series Dragnet (2003), a part in the recent cult classic Harold & Kumar Go to White Castle (2004), and a guest-starring role on the series Numb3rs (2005). He has been married to actresses Amelinda Smith, with whom he has one child, and Sunny Mabrey.
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  • Jason ClarkeEd White

    Jason Clarke is an Australian actor, known for often being cast in antagonist roles in feature films. In 1969, Clarke was born in Winton, Queensland, a small town where the main industries are sheep and cattle raising. Winton was established as a township in 1879, but its main claim to fame are a number of dinosaur fossils located within the town's limits. Clarke was the son of a sheep shearer, bud decided to follow an acting career instead. By 1995, the 26-year-old Clarke had started appearing in small parts in various television series. He then started appearing as an extra in films. His early film appearances included the action comedy "Wanted" (1997), the action film "Dilemma" (1997), and the neo-noir crime drama "Twilight" (1998). Clarke had a more substantial role in the crime comedy "Our Lips are Sealed" (2000), where he played the assassin Mac. Clarke returned to playing small roles in films such as the period drama "Rabbit-Proof Fence" (2002) and the serial killer-themed black comedy "You Can't Stop the Murders" (2003). Clarke had a breakthrough television role as the co-star of the crime drama television series "Brotherhood" (2006-2008). In the series, Clarke played career politician Tommy Caffee, who has a complex relationship with his brother, the Irish-mob employed gangster Michael Caffee (played by Jason Isaacs). The series was loosely based on the lives of two real-life brothers with different careers, the Democratic politician and academic William Bulger (1934-) and the crime boss Whitey Bulger (1929-2018). The series won much critical praise for Clarke, though some critics disliked its humorless approach to its subject matter. In 2008, Clarke played the leading role of Howard Ferp in the live-action short film "Hole in the Paper Sky". In the film, Howard is a lonely misanthrope. He finds himself feeling genuine affection for a dog, which is used as a laboratory animal. The short film won awards by the Beverly Hills Film Festival and the Florida Film Festival. Also in 2008, Clarke played T. Ulrich, one of the main villains in the action thriller film "Death Race". In 2009, Clarke portrayed the Canadian gangster John "Red" Hamilton (1899-1934) in the crime drama film "Public Enemies". The film was an adaptation of the non-fiction book "Public Enemies: America's Greatest Crime Wave and the Birth of the FBI, 1933-34", which depicted the lives and deaths of a number of professional criminals during the Great Depression. Clarke next had a small role in the drama film "Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps" (2010), as the New York Fed Chief. The film was a sequel to the drama film "Wall Street", and depicted the financial crisis of 2007-2008. Clarke also played the role of FBI agent Doug Tate in the thriller film "Trust" (2010), which focused on the relationship between a teenage girl and an online predator. In 2011, Clarke played the abusive father Gordon O'Hara in the drama film "Yelling to the Sky". In 2011, the film was nominated for the Golden Bear award at the Berlin International Film Festival, but lost the award to the Iranian drama film "A Separation". Clarke also played the police officer Frank in the neo-noir thriller "Swerve" (2011). Finally, in 2011, Clarke gained another leading role in television. He played the Polish-American homicide detective Jarek Wysocki in the short-lived police procedural series "The Chicago Code" (February-May, 2011). In the series, Jarek is the leader of a special unit of the Chicago Police Department, which investigates political corruption, and the connections between Chigago politicians and organized crime. In 2012, Clarke played moonshine smuggler Howard Bondurant in the crime-drama film "Lawless". The film was an adaptation of the historical novel "The Wettest County in the World" by Matt Bondurant, and depicts the lives of moonshine smugglers in Virginia from 1931 to 1933. The film was nominated for the Palme d'Or (Golden Palm) award at the 2012 Cannes Film Festival, but lost the award to the French-language romantic tragedy "Amour". Also in 2012, Clarke played the role of the CIA intelligence officer Dan in the thriller film "Zero Dark Thirty". The film depicted the then-recent assassination of Al-Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden (1957-2011) by personnel the United States Navy SEALs. The film earned about 133 million dollars at the worldwide box office. and was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture. Clarke himself was nominated for the "Chicago Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Actor" for his role in the film. But the award for that year was instead won by rival actor Philip Seymour Hoffman (1967-2014). In 2013, Clarke played the mechanic George Wilson in the romantic drama "The Great Gatsby", an adaptation of the novel "The Great Gatsby" by Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald (1896-1940). Also in 2013, Clarke played the mercenary leader Emil Stenz in the action thriller "White House Down". In 2014, Clarke played the illiterate farmer and carpenter Thomas Lincoln (1778-1851) in the historical film "The Better Angels". Thomas was the father of politician Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), and the film focuses on the family life of the Lincoln family in Indiana from 1817 to 1821. Clarke also played a prominent role in the science fiction film "Dawn of the Planet of the Apes" (2014), cast as Malcolm, a human friend of the apes' leader Caesar (played by Andy Serkis). In 2015, Clarke gained the main cast role of John Connor in the science-fiction film "Terminator Genisys", the fifth film of "The Terminator" franchise. John Connor is the main protagonist of the franchise, and had previously been played (at various ages of his life) by the actors Dalton Abbot, Edward Furlong, Michael Edwards, Nick Stahl, Christian Bale, John De Vito, and Thomas Dekker. The film gained about 441 million dollars at the worldwide box office, becoming the second-most lucrative film in "The Terminator" franchise, following "Terminator 2: Judgment Day" (1991). Also in 2015, Clarke played the mountaineer Rob Hall (1961-1996) in the biographical film "Everest". The film was based on the 1996 Mount Everest disaster, when 8 mountaineers were killed in a blizzard on Mount Everest. Most of them had successfully climbed on the summit of the mountain, but were caught in the blizzard while attempting to descend from the summit. Hall was the most experienced mountaineer among them, as he had reached the summit of Everest five times (a record for non-Sherpa mountaineers). The film earned abut 203 million dollars at the worldwide box office. In 2016, Clarke played the ambiguous role of James in the psychological drama "All I See Is You". In 2017, Clarke returned to playing leading roles in historical films. He portrayed Reinhard Heydrich (1904-1942), the Director of the Reich Main Security Office (term 1939-1942) in "The Man with the Iron Heart", and Ted Kennedy (1932-2009), the United States Senator from Massachusetts (term 1962-2009) in "Chappaquiddick". The first film focused on "Operation Anthropoid" (1942), the successful assassination of Heydrich by Czechoslovak exiled soldiers, who were trained and equipped by the Special Operations Executive (1940-1946) of the United Kingdom. The second film focuses on the Chappaquiddick incident of 1969, when Kennedy's negligence during and after a single-vehicle car accident caused the death of political campaign specialist Mary Jo Kopechne (1940-1969). Kennedy was driving the vehicle with Kopechne as a passenger. The accident trapped Kopechne inside the submerged vehicle, but Kennedy did not try to help her and only reported the accident to the police 10 hours later. Kennedy received a two-month suspended jail sentence for his role in the incident. Also in 2017, Clarke played the role of Henry McAllan in the period drama "Mudbound". Henry is depicted as a farmer living in near poverty in Mississippi during the late 1930s and 1940s, while having to care for an aging father who is a bigoted member of the local Ku Klux Klan, and for a war veteran brother who is suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder. The film was nominated for a "Satellite Award for Best Film", but the award for that year was instead shared by the films "God's Own Country" and "Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri". In 2018, Clarke played the supporting role of Dr. Eric Price in the horror film "Winchester". The film presents a fictionalized account of the life of Sarah Winchester (1839-1922), co-owner of the Winchester Repeating Arms Company, and her survival in the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. Also in 2018, Clarke played astronaut Ed White (1930-1967) in the historical film "First Man", which depicted the Space Race of the 1960s. The historical White was the first American to walk in space (in a June, 1965 space mission), and the second person to manage to do so following the Soviet cosmonaut Alexei Leonov (1934-) (who performed the original space walk in March, 1965). In 2019, Clarke played the abusive stepfather Frank Zariakas in the neo-noir thriller "Serenity", the British colonel Lewis Morgan in the war-themed drama "The Aftermath", and Dr. Louis Creed in the resurrection-themed horror film "Pet Sematary". By 2019, Clarke was 50-years-old, but he was busier than ever in appearing in more film productions.
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