Based on the Dark Horse comic book. Centers on Hellboy, a hellacious weapon that was originally made by Nazis who planned to use it on their enemies. But the Nazis are upset when their weapon actually becomes a force for good as an investigator for the Bureau for Paranormal Research and Development, and finds himself fighting werewolves, vampires and other terrible foes.

  • 2 hr 2 minPG13HDSD
  • Apr 2, 2004
  • Action

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Cast & Crew

  • Ron PerlmanActor

    Ron Perlman is a classically-trained actor who has appeared in countless stage plays, feature films and television productions. Ronald N. Perlman was born April 13, 1950 in Washington Heights, Manhattan, New York. His mother, Dorothy (Rosen), is retired from the City Clerk's Office. His father, Bertram "Bert" Perlman, now deceased, was a repairman and a drummer. His parents were both from Jewish families (from Hungary, Germany and Poland). With a career spanning over three decades, Perlman has worked alongside such diverse actors as Marlon Brando, Sean Connery, Dominique Pinon, Brad Dourif, Ed Harris, John Hurt, Jude Law, Christina Ricci, Federico Luppi, Sigourney Weaver, Michael Wincott and Elijah Wood to name a few. While he has never been a bankable star, Perlman has always had a large fan-base. He started out strong as Amoukar, one of the tribesmen in Jean-Jacques Annaud's Academy Award-winning film Quest for Fire (1981), for which he earned a Genie Award nomination. Perlman teamed up with Annaud again, this time as a hunchback named Salvatore in The Name of the Rose (1986). His first real breakthrough came later when he landed the role of the noble lion-man Vincent, opposite Linda Hamilton on the fantasy series Beauty and the Beast (1987). His work in this role earned him not only a Golden Globe Award but an underground fan following. Sadly the series was canceled in its third season shortly after Hamilton's character's death. After that, he spent time doing supporting work on television and independent films such as Guillermo del Toro's debut Cronos (1993) (where a lifelong friendship and collaboration between the director and Perlman would blossom) as Angel and his first lead role as One in Jean-Pierre Jeunet's surreal The City of Lost Children (1995). His first real big role in a mainstream film came when Jeunet wanted him for the brutish Johner in his first Hollywood outing Alien: Resurrection (1997). Perlman has also used his distinctive voice to his advantage, appearing in many animated films/series, commercials and he is a video game fan favorite because of his work on such games as the Fallout series. It was not until much later he received worldwide fame when his good friend Guillermo del Toro helped him land the title role in the big-budget comic book movie Hellboy (2004). Del Toro fought the studio for four years because they wanted a more secure name, but he stood his ground and in 2004, after almost 25 years in and out of obscurity, Perlman became a household name and a sought out actor. Perlman has had one of the most offbeat careers in film, playing everything from a prehistoric ape-man to an aging transsexual and will always be a rarity in Hollywood. Other notable roles include the cunning Norman Arbuthnot in The Last Supper (1995), sniper expert Koulikov in Enemy at the Gates (2001), vampire leader Reinhardt in Blade II (2002), his reprisal of Hellboy in Hellboy II: The Golden Army (2008) and biker chief Clarence Morrow on the popular series Sons of Anarchy (2008). He currently resides in Los Angeles, California with his wife, Opal, and their two children, Blake and Brandon.
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  • Rupert EvansActor

  • Selma BlairActor

    One of our most exciting and versatile actresses, Selma Blair first gained attention for her performance in Cruel Intentions (1999), a youthful retelling of the classic novel "Les Liaisons Dangereuses". Selma was born in Southfield, Michigan, to Molly Ann (Cooke), a judge, and Elliot I. Beitner, a lawyer. She had a Jewish upbringing. After graduating from high school in Michigan, Selma moved to New York City to pursue her goal of being a photographer but found her way to acting classes at The Stella Adler Conservatory and Stonestreet Studios. Selma starred for two seasons as the title character in the WB's Zoe, Duncan, Jack & Jane (1999) and then appeared in the hit comedy, Legally Blonde (2001) opposite Reese Witherspoon. She then starred opposite Cameron Diaz and Christina Applegate in The Sweetest Thing (2002) and in two independent films that garnered her much critical acclaim: Dana Lustig's Kill Me Later (2001) and Todd Solondz's controversial Storytelling (2001). In 2004, Selma starred in Guillermo del Toro's Hellboy (2004) and appeared in John Waters's A Dirty Shame (2004). Her other film credits include Paul Weitz's In Good Company (2004), opposite Topher Grace in Pretty Persuasion (2005), opposite Stellan Skarsgård in The Killing Gene (2007), in Ed Burns's Purple Violets (2007), in Robert Benton's Feast of Love (2007) starring opposite Morgan Freeman and Greg Kinnear.and Newton Thomas Sigel's award-winning short film, The Big Empty (2005) opposite Elias Koteas. 2008 was a busy year for Selma Blair. After My Mom's New Boyfriend (2008) (aka "Homeland Security"), Selma returned to the big screen as "Liz Sherman" in Guillermo del Toro's blockbuster sequel, Hellboy II: The Golden Army (2008). She also starred in an independent film by writer and director Lori Petty, titled The Poker House (2008), starring opposite Oscar and Golden Globe nominee, Jennifer Lawrence. In the fall of 2008, Selma went to television and shot one season with NBC's Kath & Kim (2008), starring opposite Molly Shannon. In the fall of 2009, Selma took to the stage and played "Kathleen" in award-winning playwright Rajiv Joseph's "Gruesome Playground Injuries". In 2010, Selma starred in the suspense thriller, Columbus Circle (2012), starring opposite Jason Lee, Amy Smart, Giovanni Ribisi and Kevin Pollak. Selma did some shorts during 2010, including 3 episodes of Lisa Kudrow's Web Therapy (2008), a Danko Jones music video starring opposite Elijah Wood, a guest episode of Fred Armisen's web TV show Portlandia (2011) and a Mollie Jones short titled Animal Love (2011). Selma completed two films in 2011. In Their Skin (2012), a home invasion thriller, starring opposite James D'Arcy, and Dark Horse (2011) - Todd Solondz's latest film starring opposite Jordan Gelber, Christopher Walken and Mia Farrow. Dark Horse (2011) was selected for competition and is set to have its world premiere at the 68th annual Venice Film Festival followed by the Toronto Film Festival in September of 2011. 2011 also brings Selma Blair's latest project, motherhood. Selma and her "Ever Clothing" fashion designer boyfriend, Jason Bleick, welcomed their son, Arthur Saint Bleick, on July 25th 2011.
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  • Corey JohnsonActor

    Corey Johnson was born on May 17, 1961 in New Orleans, Louisiana, USA as John Johnson. He is known for his work on Captain Phillips (2013), Jackie (2016) and The Bourne Ultimatum (2007).
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  • Doug JonesActor

    The youngest of four brothers, Doug Jones was born on May 24, 1960 in Indianapolis, Indiana, and grew up in the city's Northeastside. After attending Bishop Chatard High School, he headed off to Ball State University, where he graduated in 1982 with a Bachelor's degree in Telecommunications, with a minor in Theatre. He learned mime at school, joining a troupe and doing the whole white-face thing, and has also worked as a contortionist. After a hitch in theater in Indiana, he moved to Los Angeles in 1985, and has not been out of work since - he's acted in over 25 films, many television series (Including the award-winning Buffy the Vampire Slayer (1997), his episode 'Hush' garnered two Emmy nominations) and over 90 commercials and music videos with the likes of Madonna and Marilyn Manson. Although known mostly for his work under prosthetics, he has also performed as 'himself' in such highly-rated films as Adaptation. (2002) with Nicolas Cage and indie projects such as Phil Donlon's A Series of Small Things (2005). But it is his sensitive and elegant performance as 'Abe Sapien' in Hellboy (2004), which stormed to the top of the U.S. box office in the spring of 2004, that has brought him an even higher profile and much praise from audiences and critics alike. Doug is married and lives in California.
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  • Jeffrey TamborActor

    An incisive talent when it comes to playing bent, off-the-wall characters, Jeffrey Tambor has been captivating audiences for nearly four decades. Tambor was born and raised in San Francisco, to Eileen (Salzberg) and Michael Bernard Tambor, a flooring contractor. His family is Jewish (from Hungary and Ukraine). He studied acting at San Francisco State University and earned his Bachelors of Arts degree there. Following his Masters at Wayne State University, he started building up his resume in repertory theater. He was first seen on episodic TV in the mid-'70s in both comedies (Taxi (1978), Barney Miller (1975)) and dramas (Kojak (1973), Starsky and Hutch (1975)). A large, somewhat looming fellow, his sly-eyed look and leering gaze, matched with a bright set of pearly teeth and stark pattern baldness, made him a natural for broad, warped comedy. The folks at Three's Company (1976) brought Jeffrey back time and time again, standing toe-to-toe with John Ritter and stealing many of their scenes with his noticeably bizarre gents. Before his "Three's Company" guest roles, he co-starred in the show's spin-off The Ropers (1979) with Norman Fell and Audra Lindley. He and Patty McCormack played the Ropers' chagrined neighbors. On the legitimate stage, he has been an earnest player over the years with performances in "Sly Fox" and "Glengarry Glen Ross" on Broadway in addition to roles in "Measure for Measure," "A Flea in Her Ear" and "The Seagull." On the side, Jeffrey has directed a number of stage productions and teaches acting in the Los Angeles area. Although not as well known for his film work, he made a strong dramatic impression in his film debut And Justice for All (1979), in which he played Al Pacino's half-crazed law partner. He went on to enhance a number of other movies including The Dream Chasers (1984), Mr. Mom (1983), Brenda Starr (1989), Radioland Murders (1994), Doctor Dolittle (1998), Pollock (2000). More recently he played the Mayor of Whoville in How the Grinch Stole Christmas (2000). Emmy-nominated for his quirky work on The Larry Sanders Show (1992), Jeffrey's fondness and talent for the weird and wacky has recently found a nesting roost. Quite at home amid the insanity in the series Arrested Development (2003), he recently copped another Emmy nomination as the patriarch of the highly dysfunctional Bluth family.
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  • John HurtActor

    One of stage, screen and TV's finest transatlantic talents, slight, gravel-voiced, pasty-looking John Vincent Hurt was born on January 22, 1940, in Shirebrook, a coal mining village, in Derbyshire, England. The youngest child of Phyllis (Massey), an engineer and one-time actress, and Reverend Arnould Herbert Hurt, an Anglican clergyman and mathematician, his quiet shyness betrayed an early passion for acting. First enrolled at the Grimsby Art School and St. Martin's School of Art, his focus invariably turned from painting to acting. Accepted into the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art in 1960, John made his stage debut in "Infanticide in the House of Fred Ginger" followed by "The Dwarfs." Elsewhere, he continued to build upon his 60's theatrical career with theatre roles in "Chips with Everything" at the Vaudeville; the title role in "Hamp" at the Edinburgh Festival; "Inadmissible Evidence" at Wyndham's; and "Little Malcolm and His Struggle Against the Eunuchs" at the Garrick. His movie debut occurred that same year with a supporting role in the "angry young man" British drama Young and Willing (1962), followed by small roles in Appuntamento in Riviera (1962), A Man for All Seasons (1966) and The Sailor from Gibraltar (1967). A somber, freckled, ravaged-looking gent, Hurt found his more compelling early work in offbeat theatrical characterizations with notable roles as Malcolm in "Macbeth" (1967), Octavius in "Man and Superman" (1969)," Peter in "Ride a Cock Horse (1972), Mike in '"The Caretaker" (1972), and Ben in "The Dumb Waiter" (1973). At the same time he gained more prominence in a spray of film and support roles such as a junior officer in Before Winter Comes (1968); the title highwayman in Sinful Davey (1969); a morose little brother in In Search of Gregory (1969); a dim, murderous truck driver in 10 Rillington Place (1971); a skirt-chasing, penguin-studying biologist in Cry of the Penguins (1971); the unappetizing son of a baron in The Pied Piper (1972); and a repeat of his title stage role as Little Malcolm and His Struggle Against the Eunuchs (1974). Hurt shot to international stardom, however, on TV where he was allowed to display his true, fearless range. He reaped widespread acclaim for his embodiment of the tormented gay writer and raconteur Quentin Crisp in the landmark television play The Naked Civil Servant (1975), adapted from Crisp's autobiography. Hurt's bold, unabashed approach on the flamboyant and controversial gent who dared to be different was rewarded with the BAFTA (British TV Award). This triumph led to the equally fascinating success as the cruel and crazed Roman emperor Caligula in the epic television masterpiece I, Claudius (1976), followed by another compelling interpretation as murderous student Raskolnikov in Crime and Punishment (1979). A resurgence occurred on film as a result. Among other unsurpassed portraits on his unique pallet, the chameleon in him displayed a polar side as the gentle, pathetically disfigured title role in The Elephant Man (1980), and as a tortured Turkish prison inmate who befriends Brad Davis in the intense drama Midnight Express (1978) earning Oscar nominations for both. Mainstream box-office films were offered as well as art films. He made the most of his role as a crew member whose body becomes host to an unearthly predator in Alien (1979). With this new rush of fame came a few misguided ventures as well that were generally unworthy of his talent. Such brilliant work as his steeple chase jockey in Champions (1984) or kidnapper in The Hit (1984) was occasionally offset by such drivel as the comedy misfire Partners (1982) with Ryan O'Neal in which Hurt looked enervated and embarrassed. For the most part, the craggy-faced actor continued to draw extraordinary notices. Tops on the list includes his prurient governmental gadfly who triggers the Christine Keeler political sex scandal in the aptly-titled Scandal (1989); the cultivated gay writer aroused and obsessed with struggling "pretty-boy" actor Jason Priestley in Love and Death on Long Island (1997); and the Catholic priest embroiled in the Rwanda atrocities in Beyond the Gates (2005). Latter parts included the recurring role of the benign wand-maker Mr. Ollivander in Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone (2001) and Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 (2010), and the voice of The Dragon in Merlin (2008). Among Hurt's final film appearances were as a terminally ill screenwriter in That Good Night (2017) and a lesser role in the mystery thriller Damascus Cover (2017). Hurt's voice was also tapped into animated features and documentaries, often serving as narrator. He also returned to the theatre performing in such shows as "The Seagull," "A Month in the Country" (1994), "Afterplay" (2002) and "Krapp's Last Tape," the latter for which he received the Los Angeles Drama Critics Circle Award." A recovered alcoholic who married four times, Hurt was appointed Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) by the Queen in 2004, and Knight Bachelor of the Order of the British Empire in 2015. That same year (2015) he was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. In July of 2016, he was forced to bow out of the father role of Billy Rice in a then-upcoming London stage production of "The Entertainer" opposite Kenneth Branagh due to ill health that he described as an "intestinal ailment." Hurt died several months later at his home in Cromer, Norfolk, England on January 15, 2017, three days after his 77th birthday.
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  • Karel RodenActor

  • Guillermo del ToroDirector

  • Guillermo del ToroWriter