Multiple story lines interweave as a number of characters who help plan and orchestrate weddings find that their own relationships are completely out of whack.

  • 1 hr 30 minPG13
  • Dec 4, 2020
  • Comedy

Cast & Crew

  • Diane KeatonActor

    Diane Keaton was born Diane Hall in Los Angeles, California, to Dorothy Deanne (Keaton), an amateur photographer, and John Newton Ignatius "Jack" Hall, a civil engineer and real estate broker. She studied Drama at Santa Ana College, before dropping out in favor of the Neighborhood Playhouse in New York. After appearing in summer stock for several months, she got her first major stage role in the Broadway rock musical "Hair". As understudy to the lead, she gained attention by not removing any of her clothing. In 1968, Woody Allen cast her in his Broadway play "Play It Again, Sam," which had a successful run. It was during this time that she became involved with Allen and appeared in a number of his films. The first one was Play It Again, Sam (1972), the screen adaptation of the stage play. That same year Francis Ford Coppola cast her as Kay in the Oscar-winning The Godfather (1972), and she was on her way to stardom. She reprized that role in the film's first sequel, The Godfather: Part II (1974). She then appeared with Allen again in Sleeper (1973) and Love and Death (1975). In 1977, she broke away from her comedy image to appear in the chilling Looking for Mr. Goodbar (1977), which won her a Golden Globe nomination. It was the same year that she appeared in what many regard as her best performance, in the title role of Annie Hall (1977), which Allen wrote specifically for her (her real last name is Hall, and her nickname is Annie), and what an impact she made. She won the Oscar and the British Award for Best Actress, and Allen won the Directors Award from the DGA. She started a fashion trend with her unisex clothes and was the poster girl for a lot of young males. Her mannerisms and awkward speech became almost a national craze. The question being asked, though, was, "Is she just a lightweight playing herself, or is there more depth to her personality?" For whatever reason, she appeared in but one film a year for the next two years and those films were by Allen. When they broke up she was next involved with Warren Beatty and appeared in his film Reds (1981), as the bohemian female journalist Louise Bryant. For her performance, she received nominations for the Academy Award and the Golden Globe. For the rest of the 1980s she appeared infrequently in films but won nominations in three of them. Attempting to break the typecasting she had fallen into, she took on the role of a confused, somewhat naive woman who becomes involved with Middle Eastern terrorists in The Little Drummer Girl (1984). To offset her lack of movie work, Diane began directing. She directed the documentary Heaven (1987), as well as some music videos. For television she directed an episode of the popular, but strange, Twin Peaks (1990). In the 1990s, she began to get more mature roles, though she reprized the role of Kay Corleone in the third "Godfather" epic, The Godfather: Part III (1990). She appeared as the wife of Steve Martin in the hit Father of the Bride (1991) and again in Father of the Bride Part II (1995). In 1993 she once again teamed with Woody Allen in Manhattan Murder Mystery (1993), which was well received. In 1995 she received high marks for Unstrung Heroes (1995), her first major feature as a director.
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  • Maggie GraceActor

    Maggie currently stars as "Althea" on the popular AMC series "Fear the Walking Dead". She is most often recognized from the hit series "Lost" , "Californication" on Showtime, and the "Taken" and "Twilight" franchises. Maggie has also starred on Broadway in William Inge's Pulitzer Prize-winning "Picnic" directed by the Tony nominated director Sam Gold . Maggie was named one of Variety's Top 10 Actors to Watch.
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  • VERONICA FERRESActor

  • TODD STASHWICKActor

  • DIEGO BONETAActor

    Diego Andrés González Boneta was born in Mexico City, Mexico, to engineers Lauro Andrés González Lima and Astrid Boneta López. Diego recently starred as the titular character in "Luis Miguel, La Serie." The series, about the Mexican singer's rise to international fame premiered on Telemundo and Netflix and was praised by critics and fans alike. He will next be seen on the big screen in November 2019, starring opposite Arnold Schwarzenegger in the highly-anticipated film "Terminator: Dark Fate" directed by Tim Miller ("Deadpool") and produced by James Cameron. In 2020, he will star as "El Gato Negro," the eponymous hero based on Richard Dominguez's Latino comic book series. Diego's breakthrough role came about in 2012 when he was cast opposite Tom Cruise and Julianne Hough in New Line's jukebox musical "Rock of Ages." His role in the film earned him both CinemaCon's "Rising Star of the Year" award and an ALMA award for best actor. He has also been seen in the CBS miniseries "The Dovekeepers," produced by Mark Burnett and Roma Downey, which sustained an astounding nine-million viewers; Imagine Entertainment's "Pelé: Birth of a Legend" opposite Vincent D'Onofrio and Rodrigo Santoro; Voltage Pictures' thriller, "Eden" and Lionsgate's "Summer Camp." Diego's television credits include the FOX horror-comedy series "Scream Queens," alongside Emma Roberts, as well as the CW's "90210," MTV's "Underemployed" and ABC Family's "Pretty Little Liars." His career began at the age of 12 when he participated in "Codigo Fama," a children's singing reality series in Mexico. Diego was nominated for Best New Artist at the 2006 MTV Awards Latin America as well as the Best Solo Singer at the MTV Awards Latin America in 2008. Diego has been awarded GQ Latin America's "Actor of the Year" and GQ Spain's "Man of the Year."
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  • Jeremy IronsActor

    British actor Jeremy Irons was born in Cowes, Isle of Wight, a small island off the south coast of England. He is the son of Barbara Anne Brereton (Sharpe) and Paul Dugan Irons, an accountant. Young Jeremy didn't prove very fond of figures. He visited mainland England only once a year. He wound up being grounded when his family settled down in Hertfordshire. At the age of 13 he enrolled in Sherborne School, Dorset, where he could practice his favorite sport, horse-riding. Before becoming an actor, he had considered a veterinarian surgeon's career. He trained at the Bristol Old Vic School for two years, then joined Bristol Old Vic repertory company where he gained experience working in everything from Shakespeare to contemporary dramas. He moved to London in 1971 and had a number of jobs before landing the role of "John the Baptist" in the hit musical "Godspell". He went on to have a successful early career in the West End theatre and on TV, and debuted on-screen in Nijinsky (1980). In the early 80s, he gained international attention with his starring role in the Granada Television serial adaptation of Evelyn Waugh's classic novel Brideshead Revisited (1981), after which he was much in demand as a romantic leading man. He went on to a steady film career. In 1984, he debuted on Broadway opposite: Glenn Close in Tom Stoppard's "The Real Thing" and, in the mid-80s, he appeared in three lead roles with the Royal Shakespeare Company. Once described as 'the thinking woman's pin up', he has made his name in thought provoking films such as David Cronenberg's Dead Ringers (1988), for which he won the New York Critics Best Actor Award. He gained a Golden Globe Award in addition to an Oscar for Best Actor in 1990 for his role as Claus von Bulow in Reversal of Fortune (1990) alongside Glenn Close. Among his many achievements, his role as Professor Higgins in Loewe-Lerner's famous musical "My Fair Lady" mustn't be forgotten. It was in London, back in 1987. He is married to actress Sinéad Cusack, with whom he appeared in Waterland (1992) and in the Royal Shakespeare Company plays. He appeared with his son Samuel Irons and his father-in-law Cyril Cusack in the film Danny the Champion of the World (1989). His son Max Irons is also an actor.
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