• Nov 10, 2017
  • Comedy

Cast & Crew

  • Judy Greer

    Judy GreerActor

    Judy Greer was born and raised outside of Detroit, Michigan, as Judith Therese Evans. She is the daughter of Mollie Ann (née Greer), a hospital administrator and former nun, and Richard Evans, a mechanical engineer. She has German, Irish, English, Welsh, and Scottish ancestry. After training for nearly ten years in classical Russian ballet, Greer shifted her interest to acting and was accepted into Chicago's prestigious Theater School at DePaul University. After a variety of odd jobs during college, from telemarketer to oyster shucker, Greer landed her first on-screen role just three days after graduation -- a small part in the Jason Lee-David Schwimmer comedy Kissing a Fool (1998). She flew to Los Angeles for the film's premiere and never left. Greer quickly landed a role in the dark comedy Jawbreaker (1999), with Rose McGowan and Rebecca Gayheart. Greer starred as a school wallflower-turned-babe in a story about high school girls who accidentally kill their best friend and try to cover up the murder. She went on to play a news correspondent in David O. Russell's Three Kings (1999), landing a memorable opening love scene with George Clooney. Her performance caught the eye of Hollywood, and she appeared next in Mike Nichols's What Planet Are You From? (2000) as a flight attendant opposite Garry Shandling. Her television credits include a recurring role as Jason Bateman's assistant Kitty on Fox's Arrested Development (2003), as well as guest-starring roles on Love & Money (1999), Maggie Winters (1998), and Early Edition (1996). Greer starred opposite Jennifer Garner in Columbia Pictures' romantic comedy 13 Going on 30 (2004), directed by Gary Winick. Greer played an office colleague alongside Garner's character, with whom she shares a checkered past. She co-starred in writer-director M. Night Shyamalan's The Village (2004), opposite Joaquin Phoenix, Adrien Brody, Bryce Dallas Howard, Sigourney Weaver, and William Hurt. Set in 1897, the film revolves around a close-knit community that lives with the knowledge that a mythical race of creatures resides in the woods surrounding them. The Village (2004) was released July 30, 2004, by Touchtone Pictures. Greer also co-starred in director Wes Craven's Cursed (2005), a modern twist on the classic werewolf tale written by Kevin Williamson. The busy actress also landed a co-starring role opposite Orlando Bloom and Susan Sarandon in writer-director Cameron Crowe's Elizabethtown (2005). Greer will play the sister of Bloom's character and daughter of Sarandon's character. She also joined Jeff Bridges and Jeanne Tripplehorn in the independent film The Amateurs (2005) by writer-director Michael Traeger. The film revolves around a motley group of friends who band together to make an amateur porn film. Greer plays a young temptress at the local mattress store who secures a role in the movie by allowing the store to be used as a film location. Greer wrapped production in New York on a co-starring role opposite Tom McCarthy ("The Station Agent") in Danny Leiner's The Great New Wonderful (2005) for Serenade Films/Sly Dog Films. The dark comedy tells five different stories against the backdrop of an uncertain post-September 11 New York. The cast also includes Maggie Gyllenhaal, Edie Falco and Tony Shalhoub. She also appeared in writer-director Adam Goldberg's psychological drama I Love Your Work (2003), opposite Giovanni Ribisi. The film is about a fictional movie star (Ribisi) and his gradual meltdown and increasing obsession with a young film student and his girlfriend. The stellar cast also included Franka Potente, Christina Ricci, and Jason Lee and debuted at the 2003 Toronto International Film Festival. In the film, Greer plays Samantha, the personal assistant of Ribisi's character. Greer had a starring role as the female lead role in the comedy The Hebrew Hammer (2003) as the feisty, fearless Esther, who joins forces with an Orthodox Jewish Blaxploitation hero (Adam Goldberg) to save Hanukkah from an evil son of Santa Claus (Andy Dick). The Hebrew Hammer (2003) debuted at the 2003 Sundance Film Festival and premiered on Comedy Central followed by a theatrical release. She also appeared in Adaptation. (2002), from director Spike Jonze. In the film, Nicolas Cage stars as self-loathing writer Charlie Kaufman (and twin brother Donald) as he attempts to adapt the novel "The Orchid Thief" for the big screen. Greer played Alice, the waitress with whom he becomes obsessed -- the object of his fantasies. Greer turned in a scene-stealing comedic performance in The Wedding Planner (2001), with Jennifer Lopez and Matthew McConaughey, in which she played Penny, Lopez's sweet but ditsy assistant who tries hard, but often falls a little short. Equally adept at more dramatic roles, Greer gave a standout performance opposite Mel Gibson in What Women Want (2000), playing a suicidal file clerk rescued by the one man who can hear women's thoughts. Greer's pivotal scene with Gibson is the heart of the film. With a genuine gift for comedy and an engaging on-screen presence, Judy Greer has quickly become one of Hollywood's most captivating young talents. Having appeared in such diverse films as Jawbreaker (1999), What Women Want (2000), The Wedding Planner (2001), and Adaptation. (2002), as well as a number of upcoming feature film projects, Greer turns in scene-stealing performances opposite some of the industry's biggest stars.
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  • Michael Shannon

    Michael ShannonActor

    Michael Corbett Shannon was born and raised in Lexington, Kentucky, the son of Geraldine Hine, a lawyer, and Donald Sutherlin Shannon, an accounting professor at DePaul University. His grandfather was entomologist Raymond Corbett Shannon. Shannon began his professional stage career in Chicago. His first acting role was in "Winterset" at the Illinois Theatre Center. Over the next several years, he continued working on the stage with such companies as Steppenwolf, The Next Lab and the Red Orchid Theatre. He subsequently relocated to London for a year, and performed on stage in London's West End in such productions as "Woyzeck", "Killer Joe" and "Bug". While in Chicago, Shannon also kept busy in front of movie and television cameras, most notably in the big screen project Chicago Cab (1997), based on the long-running stage play "Hellcab". Kangaroo Jack (2003) marked the third Jerry Bruckheimer production in which Shannon has appeared. He also appeared in Bad Boys II (2003), directed by Michael Bay and starring Will Smith and Martin Lawrence, and in Grand Theft Parsons (2003), with Johnny Knoxville and Christina Applegate. In addition, Shannon appeared in Pearl Harbor (2001), also directed by Bay. His other film credits also include Curtis Hanson's 8 Mile (2002); Cameron Crowe's Vanilla Sky (2001) with Tom Cruise; Carl Franklin's High Crimes (2002) with Morgan Freeman; John Waters' Cecil B. DeMented (2000), and Joel Schumacher's war drama Tigerland (2000).
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  • Christina Hendricks

    Christina HendricksActor

  • Ian McShane

    Ian McShaneActor

    From a lawless, foul-mouthed saloon owner in "Deadwood" to a tough, no-nonsense British gangster in "Sexy Beast," Ian McShane has virtually cornered the market on playing rogues, villains, and all-around badasses. A natural at portraying complex anti-heroes and charismatic heavies, the classically trained actor was born in Blackburn, Lancashire, England, to parents Irene (Cowley) and Harry McShane, a soccer player for Manchester United. McShane caught his first break in 1962 when he landed a lead role in "The Wild and the Willing." McShane later revealed that he had ditched class at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art to audition for the role. Since then, the award-winning actor has gone on to grab the attention of audiences and critics alike with his unforgettable portrayals of scoundrels, kings, killers, and thieves. McShane will next star opposite David Harbour in "Hellboy," directed by Neil Marshall for Lionsgate and Millennium Films. Recently he reprised his role as club owner/ex-assassin Winston opposite Keanu Reeves in "John Wick: Chapter 2," the film by director Chad Stahelski. He also played Leland, a retired sheriff with violent tendencies, opposite Patrick Wilson in "The Hollow Point," the gritty drama directed by Gonzalo López-Gallego and appeared alongside Johnny Harris and Ray Winstone in Thomas Napper's blistering boxing drama "Jawbone." Also expect to see McShane in the upcoming films "Bolden!" directed by Dan Pritzker and "Pottersville" opposite Michael Shannon. On television, McShane stars as Mr. Wednesday in Neil Gaiman's "American Gods," the hit series for Starz produced by Michael Green and Bryan Fuller. "Actor. Icon. And now god. It is a goddamn delight to be collaborating with the incomparable Ian McShane," said Michael Green recently. McShane previously starred in the Michael Green series "Kings" for NBC. McShane will also be seen opposite Dr. Dre for Apple TV's first scripted series "Vital Signs," a semi-autobiographical series loosely based on the hip-hop icon's life. McShane's formidable acting resume is as long as it is varied. McShane starred as the notoriously fearsome pirate Blackbeard opposite Johnny Depp in Disney's worldwide blockbuster hit "Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides." He starred as priest/prophet/warrior Amphiarus opposite Dwayne Johnson in MGM's "Hercules," played lead dwarf Beith in the dark fantasy flick "Snow White and the Huntsman," and portrayed good King Bramwell in Bryan Singer's modern-day fairy tale "Jack the Giant Slayer." McShane also appeared as Joe Strombel in Woody Allen's "Scoop." His universally praised performance as tough guy Teddy Bass in the cult indie hit "Sexy Beast" led one London critic to dub McShane as "The King of Cool." In a change of pace, he portrayed soft-spoken Meredith in the darkly perverse crime drama "44 Inch Chest," a film in which McShane not only starred, but also produced. McShane has also had a long and diverse career on both British and American television. Earning considerable critical acclaim as the fierce yet charismatic Al Swearengen in the much-loved David Milch HBO series "Deadwood," McShane went on to win the Golden Globe Award for Best Performance by an Actor in a Drama Series. His compelling and gritty portrayal also scored him nominations for both Emmy and SAG Awards. He went on to collect yet another Golden Globe nomination for Best Actor in a Miniseries for his riveting portrayal of the scheming, corrupt Waleran Bigod in Starz' Emmy-nominated "Pillars of the Earth." McShane also won over viewers in FX's "American Horror Story" as the very bad Santa/serial killer Leigh Emerson and as cold-blooded billionaire Andrew Finney opposite Liev Schreiber in Showtime's acclaimed series "Ray Donovan." More recently, he portrayed Sir Roger Scatcherd in the Julian Fellows' miniseries "Dr. Thorne" for ITV and also made an appearance as peacenik Brother Ray in HBO's juggernaut "Game of Thrones." Earlier in his television career McShane produced and starred as the irresistible rogue antiques dealer in the acclaimed series "Lovejoy" for the BBC and A&E, even directing several episodes himself. The show was one of the first independent co-productions with the BBC and aired in both the U.S. and U.K. Other notable portrayals on television have included his appearance in the landmark, blockbuster miniseries "Roots" and as Ken Harrison in "Whose Life is it Anyway?" McShane also played Sejanus in the miniseries "A.D.," the eponymous "Disraeli," produced by Masterpiece Theater, and Judas in NBC's "Jesus of Nazareth." An accomplished, award-winning stage actor, McShane made his West End debut in "The Promise," co-starring Dame Judi Dench and Sir Ian McKellen. The play went on to open on Broadway the following year. McShane also charmed audiences in the West End musical "The Witches of Eastwick," originating the role of the seductive, sex-obsessed Darryl Van Horne on stage in London. At the esteemed L.A. Matrix Theatre, McShane appeared in Harold Pinter's "Betrayal," Larry Atlas' "Yield of the Long Bond", as well as in John Osborne's "Inadmissible Evidence," picking up a couple of Los Angeles Drama Critics' Awards for Lead Performance in the process. In addition, McShane appeared in the 40th Anniversary revival of Harold Pinter's "The Homecoming" on Broadway. With his low, distinctive voice, McShane has also made his mark in film and television as a voiceover artist. He narrated Disney's "The Sorcerer's Apprentice," brought life to the eccentric magician Mr. Bobinsky in "Coraline," and added a sinister edge to Tai Lung in "Kung Fu Panda." McShane has also lent his rich baritone to "The Golden Compass," as well as to "Shrek The Third" as the notorious Captain Hook.
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  • Ron Perlman

    Ron PerlmanActor

  • Thomas Lennon

    Thomas LennonActor

    Thomas Lennon is a writer and actor from Oak Park, Illinois. He attended the Tisch School of the Arts at New York University, where he was a member of the influential sketch comedy group The State. The State's hit television series ran on MTV for three seasons and received an Ace Award nomination for best comedy series. After his work on The State, he and his writing partner, Robert Ben Garant, created two more popular series: Viva Variety, which ran for three seasons and was also an Ace nominee for best comedy series, and Reno 911!, on which he also played Lieutenant Jim Dangle. Reno 911! ran for six seasons on Comedy Central. As an actor, Lennon has appeared in the films Transformers: Age of Extinction, The Dark Knight Rises, Le Divorce, Heights, Conversations with Other Women, Memento, 17 Again, I Love You, Man, Cedar Rapids, Knight of Cups, Bad Teacher, Harold and Kumar 3D and What to Expect When You're Expecting. On television he has been seen in How I Met Your Mother, Sean Saves the World, The Odd Couple, Drunk History, The Santa Clarita Diet and Lethal Weapon. In 2018, Lennon will appear in the feature films: A Futile and Stupid Gesture, Puppet Master, Half Magic, Dog Days and Clint Eastwood's The 15:57 to Paris. As a television writer, his credits include: The State, Reno 911!, Viva Variety and Strangers with Candy. On IFC's 2008 list of The 50 Greatest Comedy Sketches of All Time, Lennon is the author of four: Monkey Torture, Porcupine Racetrack, Mind Match and $240 Worth of Pudding. Lennon and Garant have written numerous feature films together, including Night at the Museum, Night at the Museum: Battle of the Smithsonian, Reno 911!: Miami, The Pacifier, Balls of Fury and Hell Baby. In addition to writing films, Lennon and Garant co-authored, Writing Movies for Fun and Profit, a book about the studio system that Anna Kendrick called "The Best Book about Hollywood... Hilarious and insanely accurate." New York Times, By the Book December 1, 2016 Lennon lives in Los Angeles with his wife, the actress Jenny Robertson, and their son, Oliver.
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Cast & Crew photos provided by TMDb.

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