Cultures clash and tempers flares as the two cops named Detective Inspector Lee a Hong Kong Detective and Detective James Carter FBI, a big-mouthed work-alone Los Angeles cop who are from different worlds discovers one thing in common: they can't stand each other. With time running out, they must join forces to catch the criminals and save the eleven-year-old Chinese girl of the Chinese consul named Soo Yung.

  • 1 hr 37 minPG13
  • Sep 18, 1998
  • Action

Cast & Crew

  • Chris Tucker

    Chris TuckerActor

  • JACKIE CHAN

    JACKIE CHANActor

    Hong Kong's cheeky, lovable and best known film star, Jackie Chan endured many years of long, hard work and multiple injuries to establish international success after his start in Hong Kong's manic martial arts cinema industry. Jackie was born Kong-sang Chan on April 7, 1954, on Hong Kong's famous Victoria Peak, to Charles and Lee-Lee Chan, and the family immigrated to Canberra, Australia, in early 1960. The young Jackie was less than successful scholastically, so his father sent him back to Hong Kong to attend the rigorous China Drama Academy, one of the Peking Opera schools. Chan excelled at acrobatics, singing and martial arts and eventually became a member of the "Seven Little Fortunes" performing troupe and began lifelong friendships with fellow martial artists / actors Sammo Kam-Bo Hung and Biao Yuen. Chan journeyed back and forth to visit his parents and work in Canberra, but eventually he made his way back to Hong Kong as his permanent home. In the early 1970s Chan commenced his movie career and interestingly appeared in very minor roles in two films starring then rising martial arts superstar Bruce Lee: Fist of Fury (1972), aka "Fist of Fury" aka "The Chinese Connection", and the Warner Bros. production Enter the Dragon (1973). Not long after Lee's untimely death Chan was often cast in films cashing in on the success of Bruce Lee by utilizing words like "fist", "fury" or "dragon" in their US release titles. Chan's own film career was off and running and he swiftly appeared in many low-budget martial arts films that were churned out at a rapid fire pace by Hong Kong studios eager to satisfy the early 1970s boom in martial-arts cinema. He starred in Shaolin Wooden Men (1976) (aka "Shaolin Wooden Men"), To Kill with Intrigue (1977) (aka "To Kill With Intrigue"), Half a Loaf of Kung Fu (1978) (aka "Half A Loaf of Kung Fu") and Magnificent Bodyguards (1978) (aka "Magnificent Bodyguards"), which all fared reasonably well at the cinemas. However, he scored a major breakthrough with the hit Drunken Master (1978) (aka "Drunken Master"), which has become a cult favorite among martial arts film fans. Not too long after this, Chan made his directorial debut with The Young Master (1980) (aka "The Young Master") and then "Enter the Dragon" producer Robert Clouse lured Jackie to the US for a film planned to break Jackie into the lucrative US market. Battle Creek Brawl (1980) (aka "Battle Creek Brawl") featured Jackie competing in a "toughest Street fighter" contest set in 1940s Texas; however, Jackie was unhappy with the end result, and it failed to fire with US audiences. In a further attempt to get his name known in the US, Jackie was cast alongside Burt Reynolds, Roger Moore and Dean Martin in the Hal Needham-directed car chase flick The Cannonball Run (1981). Regrettably, Jackie was cast as a Japanese race driver and his martial arts skills are only shown in one small sequence near the film's conclusion. Stateside success was still a few years away for Jackie Chan! Undeterred, he returned to the Orient to do what he did best--make jaw-dropping action films loaded with amazing stunt work. Chan and his legendary stunt team were unparalleled in their ability to execute the most incredible fight scenes and action sequences, and the next decade would see some of their best work. Chan paired with the dynamic Sammo Hung Kam-Bo to star in Winners & Sinners (1983) (aka "Winners & Sinners"), Project A (1983) (aka "Project "A"), Wheels on Meals (1984) (aka "Wheels On Meals"), My Lucky Stars (1985) (aka "Winners & Sinners 2"), Twinkle Twinkle Lucky Stars (1985) (aka "My Lucky Stars 2", aka "Winners & Sinners 3"(. Chan then journeyed back to the US for another shot at that market, starring alongside Danny Aiello in The Protector (1985),) filmed in Hong Kong and New York. However, as with previous attempts, Jackie felt the US director--in this case, James Glickenhaus--failed to understand his audience appeal and the film played to lukewarm reviews and box-office receipts. Jackie did, however, decide to "harden" up his on-screen image somewhat and his next film, Police Story (1985) (aka "Police Story") was a definite departure from previously light-hearted martial arts fare, and his fans loved the final product! This was quickly followed up with the Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981)-influenced Armour of God (1986) (aka "The Armour of God"), during filming of which Jackie mistimed a leap from a wall to a tree on location in Yugoslavia and fell many quite a few feet onto his head, causing a skull fracture. It was another in a long line of injuries that Chan has suffered as a result of doing his own stunt work, and he was soon back in front of the cameras. Project A 2 (1987) (aka "Project A: Part 2"), Police Story 2 (1988) (aka "Police Story 2"), Mr. Canton and Lady Rose (1989) (aka "Mr. Canton and Lady Rose)", Armour of God 2: Operation Condor (1991) (aka "Armour of God 2") and Supercop (1992) (aka "Police Story 3") were all sizable hits for Jackie, escalating his status to phenomenal heights in Asia, and to his loyal fan base around the globe. US success was now just around the corner for the the hard-working Jackie Chan, and it arrived in the form of the action film Rumble in the Bronx (1995) (aka "Rumble In The Bronx", though it was actually filmed in Canada) that successfully blended humor and action to make a winning formula in US theaters. Jackie did not waste any time and went to work on Police Story 4: First Strike (1996) (aka "Police Story 4"), Mr. Nice Guy (1997) (aka "Mr. Nice Guy"), Who Am I? (1998) (aka "Who Am I"), which all met with positive results at the international box office. Jackie then went to work in the his biggest-budget US production, starring alongside fast-talking comedian Chris Tucker in the action / comedy Rush Hour (1998). The film was a bigger hit than "Rumble In the Bronx" and firmly established Jackie as a bona fide star in the US. Jackie then paired up with rising talent Owen Wilson to star in Shanghai Noon (2000) and its sequel, Shanghai Knights (2003), and re-teamed with Tucker in Rush Hour 2 (2001), as well as starring in The Tuxedo (2002), The Medallion (2003) and the delightful Around the World in 80 Days (2004). Not one to forget his loyal fan base, Jackie returned to more gritty and traditional fare with New Police Story (2004) (aka "New Police Story") and The Myth (2005) (aka "The Myth"). The multi-talented Chan (he's also a major recording star in Asia) shows no sign of slowing down and has long since moved out of the shadow of Bruce Lee, to whom he was usually compared early in his career. Chan is truly one of the international film industry's true maverick actor / director / stuntman / producer combinations - he has done it the hard way, and always his way to achieve his dreams and goals to be an international cinematic star. Off screen he has been directly involved in many philanthropic ventures providing financial assistance to schools and universities around the world. He is a UNICEF GoodWill Ambassador, and he has campaigned against animal abuse and pollution and assisted with disaster relief efforts to the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami victims.
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  • Tom Wilkinson

    Tom WilkinsonActor

    Popular British character actor Tom Wilkinson was born in Leeds, West Yorkshire, England, and comes from a long line of urban farmers. He is the son of Marjorie (Percival) and Thomas Wilkinson. Economic hardships forced his family to move to Canada for a few years when Wilkinson was a child; after he had returned to England, he attended and graduated from the University of Kent at Canterbury with a degree in English and American Literature. Wilkinson first became active in film and television in the mid-1970s, but did not become familiar to an international audience until 1997. That was when he starred as one of six unemployed workers who strip for cash in Best Picture nominee The Full Monty (1997), and he went on to win a BAFTA for Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role. That same year, he was featured in Oscar and Lucinda (1997) and Wilde (1997). Wilkinson was also shown to memorable effect as a theatre financier with acting aspirations in Best Picture winner Shakespeare in Love (1998). Over the next few years, Wilkinson would become more popular, especially with American audiences, with such roles as General Cornwallis alongside Mel Gibson in the blockbuster The Patriot (2000) and as the grief-stricken father, Matt Fowler, in the critically acclaimed Best Picture nominee In the Bedroom (2001). For his role in that movie, he received a nomination for Best Actor in a Leading Role. Since then, Wilkinson has made memorable appearances in Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004), Batman Begins (2005), The Exorcism of Emily Rose (2005), Valkyrie (2008), Duplicity (2009), The Ghost Writer (2010), The Debt (2010) and The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel (2011), among others. Wilkinson also received his second Academy Award nomination for his acclaimed role in Michael Clayton (2007). Wilkinson won an Emmy Award for his work as Benjamin Franklin in HBO's John Adams (2008) mini-series. The same year, he received an Emmy nomination for his role in HBO movie Recount (2008), and has also received Emmy nominations for Normal (2003) and The Kennedys (2011). Wilkinson has two children, Alice and Molly, with wife Diana Hardcastle.
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  • Tzi Ma

    Tzi MaActor

    Tzi Ma was born in Hong Kong and immigrated to the United States at a young age. Together with his parents and four of his siblings, he worked in a family-owned restaurant on Staten Island, New York, where he still has his elementary school friends he's in touch with. One of the most prolific and versatile actors working today, Tzi Ma has worked alongside many of the biggest names in Hollywood. He honed his craft in many of the off-Broadway and regional theaters shows, and worked with acclaimed playwright David Henry Hwang on his first two plays FOB, and The Dance and the Railroad (a play specifically written for Tzi) at the Public theater, and with Eric Overmyer on In Perpetuity Throughout the Universe (also specifically written for Tzi) at the Hudson Guild and Baltimore Center Stage to name a few. His first acting role on the screen was in Ullie Lommel's cult jet-set film Cocaine Cowboys alongside Jack Palance and Andy Warhol in 1978. The claim to fame for that film was that the Nassau county police department at Montauk Point mistook them for real cocaine dealers, confiscated many duffel bags of powdered sugar and production cash and held up production for several days. Most recently, Tzi played the pivotal role of General Shang in Denis Villeneuve's Arrival, a film with Amy Adams which was both critically acclaimed and a box office success. From his role as Hinh, a deadly-efficient assassin and nationalist triple-agent masquerading as Michael Caine's assistant in The Quiet American, to his hilarious, lit-cigarette-swallowing take on The General in Joel and Ethan Coen's The Ladykillers, Tzi always delivers the unexpected. Over the years, he has amassed a distinguished body of work and has come to be a household face. Of course, audiences will always remember Tzi's Counsel/Ambassador Han from Rush Hour and Rush Hour III. His other favorite major film credits include Million Dollar Arm, Dante's Peak, Akeelah and The Bee, Chain Reaction, and Rapid Fire Tzi is also a firm believer in supporting indie films, particularly involving Asian-Canadian or Asian-American writers, directors, and producers. These films include Golden Gate written by David Henry Hwang, which centers around the unjust treatment of the Chinese American community during the McCarthy era; Catfish in Black Bean Sauce by writer/director Chi Muoi Lo, which tackles the lighter side of race relations, family dynamics, and love between an Asian American man and an African American woman; Red Doors by writer/director Georgia Lee - a re-imagining of Shakespeare's The Tempest in an Asian American setting; Formosa Betrayed Produced by Will Tiao, who examines the desire for Taiwanese independence springing from the "white terror" incident; #1 Serial Killer by writer/director Stanley Yung, a rare Asian American horror film; Pali Road by writer/director/producer Jonathan Lim, a psychological mystery thriller love story; Mike, Mike Tan by writer/director Aimee Long, which deals with a Chinese American cop who accidentally kills an Africa American man in the line of duty; and Meditation Park by writer/director/producer Mina Shum, who takes on the challenge of telling the experiences of a first-generation immigrant woman's journey of self-discovery and growth toward independence. His portrayal as Bing, the husband in Mina's Meditation Park garnered Tzi a Best Actor in A Leading Role Nomination from the Academy of Canadian Cinema & Television. Through their talented and diverse voices, we share with the world our stories. Notable recurring roles on television includes, the Dragon in ABC's Once Upon a Time; General Onoda in Amazon's The Man in the High Castle; Tao in AMC's Hell on Wheels; President Lu Chi Jang in HBO's Veep; Yao in HBO's Silicon Valley; Ambassador Lu in ABC's Commander in Chief; Cheng Zhi in FOX's 24 and 24:Live Another Day; Dr. Henry Lu in CBS's City of Angels; Det. Harold Ng in ABC's NYPD Blues; Lee Hei in CBS's Martial Law; and as Bah Bah in FOX's animated series American Dad.
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  • MARK ROLSTON

    MARK ROLSTONActor

  • Philip Baker Hall

    Philip Baker HallActor

Cast & Crew photos provided by TMDb.