The untold story behind the miracle on the Hudson

On January 15, 2009, the world witnessed the 'Miracle on the Hudson' when Captain 'Sully' Sullenberger glided his disabled plane onto the frigid waters of the Hudson River, saving the lives of all 155 aboard. However, even as Sully was being heralded by the public and the media for his unprecedented feat of aviation skill, an investigation was unfolding that threatened to destroy his reputation and his career. 'Sully' also stars Aaron Eckhart ('Olympus Has Fallen,' 'The Dark Knight') as Sully's co-pilot, Jeff Skiles, and Oscar nominee Laura Linney ('The Savages,' 'Kinsey,' Showtime's 'The Big C') as Sully's wife, Lorrie Sullenberger. Eastwood is directing the film from a screenplay by Todd Komarnicki, based on the book Highest Duty by Sullenberger and Jeffrey Zaslow. The project is being produced by Eastwood, Frank Marshall, Allyn Stewart and Tim Moore, with Kipp Nelson and Bruce Berman serving as executive producers. The film reunites Eastwood with several of his longtime collaborators, who most recently worked with the director on the worldwide hit 'American Sniper': director of photography Tom Stern and production designer James J. Murakami, who were both Oscar-nominated for their work on 'The Changeling'; costume designer Deborah Hopper; and editor Blu Murray. The music is by Christian Jacob and The Tierney Sutton Band. Warner Bros. Pictures presents, in association with Village Roadshow Pictures, a Flashlight Films production, a Kennedy/Marshall Company production, a Malpaso production, 'Sully.' The film, which opens on September 9, 2016, will be distributed worldwide by Warner Bros. Pictures, a Warner Bros. Entertainment Company, and in select territories by Village Roadshow Pictures.

  • 1 hr 36 minPG13
  • Sep 9, 2016
  • Drama

Cast & Crew

  • Tom Hanks

    Tom HanksChesley 'Sully' Sullenberger

    Thomas Jeffrey Hanks was born in Concord, California, to Janet Marylyn (Frager), a hospital worker, and Amos Mefford Hanks, an itinerant cook. His mother's family, originally surnamed "Fraga", was entirely Portuguese, while his father was of mostly English ancestry. Tom grew up in what he has called a "fractured" family. He moved around a great deal after his parents' divorce, living with a succession of step-families. No problems, no alcoholism - just a confused childhood. He has no acting experience in college and credits the fact that he could not get cast in a college play with actually starting his career. He went downtown, and auditioned for a community theater play, was invited by the director of that play to go to Cleveland, and there his acting career started. Ron Howard was working on Splash (1984), a fantasy-comedy about a mermaid who falls in love with a business executive. Howard considered Hanks for the role of the main character's wisecracking brother, which eventually went to John Candy. Instead, Hanks landed the lead role and the film went on to become a surprise box office success, grossing more than $69 million. After several flops and a moderate success with the comedy Dragnet (1987), Hanks' stature in the film industry rose. The broad success with the fantasy-comedy Big (1988) established him as a major Hollywood talent, both as a box office draw and within the film industry as an actor. For his performance in the film, Hanks earned his first Academy Award nomination as Best Actor. Hanks climbed back to the top again with his portrayal of a washed-up baseball legend turned manager in A League of Their Own (1992). Hanks has stated that his acting in earlier roles was not great, but that he subsequently improved. In an interview with Vanity Fair, Hanks noted his "modern era of movie making ... because enough self-discovery has gone on ... My work has become less pretentiously fake and over the top". This "modern era" began for Hanks, first with Sleepless in Seattle (1993) and then with Philadelphia (1993). The former was a blockbuster success about a widower who finds true love over the radio airwaves. Richard Schickel of Time magazine called his performance "charming", and most critics agreed that Hanks' portrayal ensured him a place among the premier romantic-comedy stars of his generation. In Philadelphia, he played a gay lawyer with AIDS who sues his firm for discrimination. Hanks lost 35 pounds and thinned his hair in order to appear sickly for the role. In a review for People, Leah Rozen stated, "Above all, credit for Philadelphia's success belongs to Hanks, who makes sure that he plays a character, not a saint. He is flat-out terrific, giving a deeply felt, carefully nuanced performance that deserves an Oscar." Hanks won the 1993 Academy Award for Best Actor for his role in Philadelphia. During his acceptance speech, he revealed that his high school drama teacher Rawley Farnsworth and former classmate John Gilkerson, two people with whom he was close, were gay. Hanks followed Philadelphia with the blockbuster Forrest Gump (1994) which grossed a worldwide total of over $600 million at the box office. Hanks remarked: "When I read the script for Gump, I saw it as one of those kind of grand, hopeful movies that the audience can go to and feel ... some hope for their lot and their position in life ... I got that from the movies a hundred million times when I was a kid. I still do." Hanks won his second Best Actor Academy Award for his role in Forrest Gump, becoming only the second actor to have accomplished the feat of winning consecutive Best Actor Oscars. Hanks' next role - astronaut and commander Jim Lovell, in the docudrama Apollo 13 (1995) - reunited him with Ron Howard. Critics generally applauded the film and the performances of the entire cast, which included actors Kevin Bacon, Bill Paxton, Gary Sinise, Ed Harris, and Kathleen Quinlan. The movie also earned nine Academy Award nominations, winning two. Later that year, Hanks starred in Disney/Pixar's computer-animated film Toy Story (1995), as the voice of Sheriff Woody. A year later, he made his directing debut with the musical comedy That Thing You Do! (1996) about the rise and fall of a 1960s pop group, also playing the role of a music producer.
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  • Holt McCallany

    Holt McCallanyMike Cleary

    In a film career spanning over 30 years, Holt McCallany has appeared in close to 100 films and television shows, and has worked with some of the world's best directors including David Fincher, David O'Russell, William Friedkin, Lawrence Kasdan, Walter Hill, Clint Eastwood, Brian De Palma, and Michael Mann amongst others. Holt currently stars in the Netflix series Mindhunter for director David Fincher where he plays Bill Tench, a FBI agent researching serial killers in the late 1970s. Mindhunter is one of the most critically acclaimed shows on television. Holt has appeared in memorable supporting roles in movies like Fight Club ("His name was Robert Paulson!"), Three Kings, Black Hat, Alien III, Men of Honor, and Sully, to name a few. In 2011, Holt was the star of the raw and gritty television series Light's Out on FX where he played a boxer with pugilistic dementia. Born into a theater family, Holt's father, Michael, was a Tony Award winning Broadway producer and his mother was the legendary cabaret singer Julie Wilson. At 14, Holt ran away from home and took a Greyhound bus to Hollywood with dreams of becoming an actor, but he ended up working in a screwdriver factory. His parents eventually tracked him down and sent him to a boarding school in Ireland -- Newbridge College, County Kildare -- that his father had attended 40 years earlier. At 18, Holt traveled to France where he studied French at the Sorbonne, art at The Paris American Academy and, later, theater at L'École Marcel Marceau and L'École Jacques Lecoq. He went on to study Shakespeare at Oxford and later worked extensively in theater in the United States and abroad. Holt also works as a writer and producer and currently has two films in development, I, Redeemer and Kill the Pretty Horses. Holt is a supporter of the Irish Arts Center in New York and in 2011 was named the American Ireland Fund's Man of the Year. He also served as president of the jury at the Festival International du Film de Bruxelles. Holt's work as an activist includes his longtime support of the Dr. Theodore Atlas Foundation as well as his work for the wrongfully convicted. He is unmarried and he lives in New York City.
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  • Laura Linney

    Laura LinneyLorrie Sullenberger

    Laura Leggett Linney was born in New York City on February 5, 1964, into a theatre family. Her father was prominent playwright Romulus Linney, whose own great-grandfather was a congressman from North Carolina. Her mother, Miriam Anderson (Leggett), is a nurse. Although she did not live in her father's house (her parents having divorced when she was an infant), Linney's world revolved, in part, around his profession from the earliest age. She graduated from Brown University in 1986 and studied acting at Juilliard and the Arts Theatre School in Moscow and, thereafter, embarked on a career on the Broadway stage receiving favorable notices for her work in such plays as "Hedda Gabler" and "Six Degrees of Separation". Linney's film career began in the early 1990s with small roles in Lorenzo's Oil (1992) and Dave (1993). She landed the role of Mary Anne Singleton in the PBS film adaptations of Armistead Maupin's "Tales of the City" series, playing her in Tales of the City (1993), More Tales of the City (1998) and Further Tales of the City (2001). Linney's first substantial big-screen role was as the ex-girlfriend of Richard Gere's character in Primal Fear (1996) and her superb performance brought her praise and a better selection of roles. Clint Eastwood chose Linney to play his daughter, another prominent role, in 1997's Absolute Power (1997), followed by another second billing in the following year's The Truman Show (1998). Always a strong performer, Linney truly came into her own after 2000, starting the decade auspiciously with her widely-praised, arguably flawless performance in You Can Count on Me (2000). She found herself nominated for an Academy Award for this, her first lead role, for which her salary had been $10,000. Linney won numerous critics' awards for her role as Sammy, a single mother whose life is complicated by a new boss and the arrival in town of her aimless brother. On the heels of this success came her marvelous turn as Bertha Dorset in The House of Mirth (2000), clearly the best performance in a film of strong performances. Since then, Linney has frequently been offered challenging dramatic roles, and always rises to the occasion, such as in Mystic River (2003) and Kinsey (2004), for which she received another Academy Award nomination.
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  • Sam Huntington

    Sam HuntingtonActor

  • Aaron Eckhart

    Aaron EckhartJeff Skiles

    Aaron Eckhart was born on March 12, 1968 in Cupertino, California, USA as Aaron Edward Eckhart. He is an actor and producer, known for The Dark Knight (2008), Thank You for Smoking (2005) and In the Company of Men (1997).
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  • Autumn Reeser

    Autumn ReeserActor

Cast & Crew photos provided by TMDb.