Academy Award winners Julia Roberts and Denzel Washington star in this thriller about a young law student whose theory about the recent deaths of two Supreme Court justices embroils her in a web of greed, corruption and murder that reaches to the very top of the United States government.

  • 2 hr 21 minPG13HDSD
  • Dec 17, 1993
  • Suspense

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Cast & Crew

  • Denzel WashingtonActor

    Denzel Hayes Washington, Jr. was born on December 28, 1954 in Mount Vernon, New York. He is the middle of three children of a beautician mother, Lennis, from Georgia, and a Pentecostal minister father, Denzel Washington, Sr., from Virginia. After graduating from high school, Denzel enrolled at Fordham University, intent on a career in journalism. However, he caught the acting bug while appearing in student drama productions and, upon graduation, he moved to San Francisco and enrolled at the American Conservatory Theater. He left A.C.T. after only one year to seek work as an actor. His first paid acting role was in a summer stock theater stage production in St. Mary's City, Maryland. The play was "Wings of the Morning", which is about the founding of the colony of Maryland (now the state of Maryland) and the early days of the Maryland colonial assembly (a legislative body). He played the part of a real historical character, Mathias Da Sousa, although much of the dialogue was created. Afterwards he began to pursue screen roles in earnest. With his acting versatility and powerful presence, he had no difficulty finding work in numerous television productions. He made his first big screen appearance in Carbon Copy (1981) with George Segal. Through the 1980s, he worked in both movies and television and was chosen for the plum role of Dr. Philip Chandler in NBC's hit medical series St. Elsewhere (1982), a role that he would play for six years. In 1989, his film career began to take precedence when he won the Oscar for Best Supporting Actor for his portrayal of Tripp, the runaway slave in Edward Zwick's powerful historical masterpiece Glory (1989). Washington has received much critical acclaim for his film work since the 1990s, including his portrayals of real-life figures such as South African anti-apartheid activist Steve Biko in Cry Freedom (1987), Muslim minister and human rights activist Malcolm X in Malcolm X (1992), boxer Rubin "Hurricane" Carter in The Hurricane (1999), football coach Herman Boone in Remember the Titans (2000), poet and educator Melvin B. Tolson in The Great Debaters (2007), and drug kingpin Frank Lucas in American Gangster (2007). Malcolm X and The Hurricane garnered him Oscar nominations for Best Actor, before he finally won that statuette in 2002 for his lead role in Training Day (2001). Through the 1990s, Denzel also co-starred in such big budget productions as The Pelican Brief (1993), Philadelphia (1993), Crimson Tide (1995), The Preacher's Wife (1996), and Courage Under Fire (1996), a role for which he was paid $10 million. He continued to define his onscreen persona as the tough, no-nonsense hero through the 2000s in films like Out of Time (2003), Man on Fire (2004), Inside Man (2006), and The Taking of Pelham 123 (2009). Cerebral and meticulous in his film work, he made his debut as a director with Antwone Fisher (2002); he also directed The Great Debaters (2007) and Fences (2016). In 2010, Washington headlined The Book of Eli (2010), a post-Apocalyptic drama. Later that year, he starred as a veteran railroad engineer in the action film Unstoppable (2010), about an unmanned, half-mile-long runaway freight train carrying dangerous cargo. The film was his fifth and final collaboration with director Tony Scott, following Crimson Tide (1995), Man on Fire (2004), Déjà Vu (2006) and The Taking of Pelham 1 2 3. He has also been a featured actor in the films produced by Jerry Bruckheimer and has been a frequent collaborator of director Spike Lee. In 2012, Washington starred in Flight (2012), for which he was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actor. He co-starred with Ryan Reynolds in Safe House (2012), and prepared for his role by subjecting himself to a torture session that included waterboarding. In 2013, Washington starred in 2 Guns (2013), alongside Mark Ryan Walberg. In 2014, he starred in The Equalizer (2014), an action thriller film directed by Antoine Fuqua and written by Richard Wenk, based on the television series of same name starring Edward Woodward. During this time period, he also took on the role of producer for some of his films, including The Book of Eli and Safe House. In 2016, he was selected as the recipient for the Cecil B. DeMille Lifetime Achievement Award at the 73rd Golden Globe Awards. He lives in Los Angeles, California with his wife, Pauletta Washington, and their four children.
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  • Sam ShepardActor

    Sam Shepard was born Samuel Shepard Rogers in Fort Sheridan, IL, to Jane Elaine (Schook), a teacher, and Samuel Shepard Rogers, a teacher and farmer who was also in the army. As the eldest son of a US Army officer (and WWII bomber pilot), Shepard spent his early childhood moving from base to base around the US until finally settling in Duarte, CA. While at high school he began acting and writing and worked as a ranch hand in Chino. He graduated high school in 1961 and then spent a year studying agriculture at Mount San Antonio Junior College, intending to become a vet. In 1962, though, a touring theater company, the Bishop's Company Repertory Players, visited the town and he joined up and left home to tour with them. He spent nearly two years with the company and eventually settled in New York where he began writing plays, first performing with an obscure off-off-Broadway group but eventually gaining recognition for his writing and winning prestigious OBIE awards (Off-Broadway) three years running. He flirted with the world of rock, playing drums for the Holy Modal Rounders, then moved to London in 1971, where he continued writing. Back in the US by 1974, he became playwright in residence at San Francisco's Magic Theater and continued to work as an increasingly well respected playwright throughout the 1970s and into the '80s. Throughout this time he had been dabbling with Hollywood, having most notably in the early days worked as one of the writers on Zabriskie Point (1970), but it was his role as Chuck Yeager in 1983's The Right Stuff (1983) (co-starring Fred Ward and Dennis Quaid) that brought him to the attention of the wider, non-theater audience. Since then he has continued to write, act and direct, both on screen and in the theater. He died of amylotropic lateral sclerosis--commonly known as Lou Gehrig's Disease--in Kentucky on July 27, 2017.
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  • Julia RobertsActor

    Julia Fiona Roberts never dreamed she would become the most popular actress in America. She was born in Smyrna, Georgia, to Betty Lou (Bredemus) and Walter Grady Roberts, one-time actors and playwrights, and is of English, Irish, Scottish, Welsh, German, and Swedish descent. As a child, due to her love of animals, Julia originally wanted to be a veterinarian, but later studied journalism. When her brother, Eric Roberts, achieved some success in Hollywood, Julia decided to try acting. Her first break came in 1988 when she appeared in two youth-oriented movies Mystic Pizza (1988) and Satisfaction (1988). The movies introduced her to a new audience who instantly fell in love with this pretty woman. Julia's biggest success was in the signature movie Pretty Woman (1990), for which Julia got an Oscar nomination, and also won the People's Choice award for Favorite Actress. Even though Julia would spend the next few years either starring in serious movies, or playing fantasy roles like Tinkerbell, the movie audiences would always love Julia best in romantic comedies. With My Best Friend's Wedding (1997) Julia gave the genre fresh life that had been lacking in Hollywood for some time. Offscreen, after a brief marriage, Julia has been romantically linked with several actors, and married cinematographer Daniel Moder in 2002; the couple has three children together. Julia has also become involved with UNICEF charities and has made visits to many different countries, including Haiti and India, in order to promote goodwill. Julia Robert remains one of the most popular and sought-after talents in Hollywood.
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  • Robert CulpActor

  • Stanley TucciActor

    Actor Stanley Tucci was born on November 11, 1960, in Peekskill, New York. He is the son of Joan (Tropiano), a writer, and Stanley Tucci, an art teacher. His family is Italian-American, with origins in Calabria. Tucci took an interest in acting while in high school, and went on to attend the State University of New York's Conservatory of Theater Arts in Purchase. He began his professional career on the stage, making his Broadway debut in 1982, and then made his film debut in Prizzi's Honor (1985). In 2009, Tucci received his first Academy Award nomination for his turn as a child murderer in The Lovely Bones (2009). He also received a BAFTA nomination and a Golden Globe nomination for the same role. Other than The Lovely Bones, Tucci has recently had noteworthy supporting turns in a broad range of movies including Lucky Number Slevin (2006), The Devil Wears Prada (2006) and Captain America: The First Avenger (2011). Tucci reached his widest audience yet when he played Caesar Flickerman in box office sensation The Hunger Games (2012). While maintaining an active career in movies, Tucci received major accolades for some work in television. He won an Emmy and a Golden Globe for his role in TV movie Winchell (1998), an Emmy for a guest turn on Monk (2002), and a Golden Globe for his role in HBO movie Conspiracy (2001). Tucci has also had an extensive career behind the camera. His directorial efforts include Big Night (1996), The Impostors (1998), Joe Gould's Secret (2000) and Blind Date (2007), and he did credited work on all of those screenplays with the exception of Joe Gould's Secret (2000). Tucci has three children with Kate Tucci, who passed away in 2009. Tucci married Felicity Blunt in August 2012.
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  • William AthertonActor

  • Tony GoldwynActor

    Actor, director, producer Tony Goldwyn just finished a sold-out run of director Ivo Van Hove's Broadway production of "Network" with Bryan Cranston and Tatiana Maslany. He can be seen on the Netflix series, "Chambers," starring with Uma Thurman. Recently he concluded his role as 'President Fitzgerald Grant' in Shonda Rhimes' remarkable series "Scandal" after its seven-season run. Goldwyn continues to juggle multiple projects both behind and in front of the camera. Previously he appeared in the feature film "Mark Felt - The Man Who Brought Down the White House" as part of an all-star cast including Liam Neeson and Diane Lane. He also starred with Sharon Stone in the indie rom-com "All I Wish." Additionally, Goldwyn starred in MGM's release, "The Belko Experiment," written and produced by James Gunn. Formerly, he co-created and executive produced the critically acclaimed series "The Divide" for AMC Studios. Goldwyn directed the two hour pilot while partner Richard LaGravenese wrote the episodes. He also took on the controversial figure Warren Jeffs, starring in the Lifetime movie, "Outlaw Prophet: Warren Jeffs" and appeared in the hit features "Divergent" and "Insurgent" based on the YA novels by Veronica Roth. In addition to acting on the shows, Goldwyn directed multiple episodes of "Scandal" along with an episode of his latest series, "Chambers." More television directing credits include prestigious programs such as "Dexter," "Justified," "Law & Order," "Damages," "Grey's Anatomy," and "The L Word," among others. Goldwyn made an auspicious feature directorial debut with "A Walk on the Moon" starring Diane Lane and Viggo Mortensen. The film premiered at the Sundance Film Festival and went on to receive universal praise from critics as well as winning a special recognition from the National Board of Review for Excellence in Independent Filmmaking. Goldwyn first read Pamela Gray's script five years earlier and shepherded it through multiple drafts until Dustin Hoffman came on board as a producer and got the project financed. Coincidentally when Gray originally wrote the screenplay as her Master's Thesis at UCLA Film School, she won the prestigious Samuel Goldwyn Writing Award - an honor established by Goldwyn's paternal grandfather, the legendary film producer. Further feature directing credits include "The Last Kiss," based on Gabriele Muccino's "L'Ultimo Bacio," for which Goldwyn received Best Director from the Boston Film Festival, and the romantic comedy "Someone Like You." His last effort, "Conviction," starring Hilary Swank and Sam Rockwell, which Goldwyn also produced, earned Swank a SAG Award nomination, won Best Film at the Boston Film Festival and was awarded a Freedom of Expression honor from the National Board of Review. As an actor, Goldwyn first caught audiences' attention with his portrayal of the villain in the box office smash "Ghost." He went on to appear in numerous other films including "The Pelican Brief" with Julia Roberts and Denzel Washington, "Kiss The Girls," Oliver Stone's "Nixon," "The Substance of Fire," "The Last Samurai" opposite Tom Cruise, and the remake of Wes Craven's classic "The Last House on the Left." He is familiar to children as the title voice in Disney's animated feature "Tarzan." His other television acting credits include "The Good Wife," "Dexter," "Law & Order: Criminal Intent," "Without A Trace," "The L Word," the HBO Mini-Series "From The Earth To The Moon," "Frasier," "Murphy Brown," and "Designing Women," where he touchingly portrayed the first AIDS victim on a prime time series. Goldwyn began his acting career on the stage, spending seven seasons at the Williamstown Theater Festival. His New York theater credits include "The Water's Edge" at the 2nd Stage Theater, "The Dying Gaul" at the Vineyard Theater, "Holiday" at The Circle in the Square opposite Laura Linney, "Spike Heels" with Kevin Bacon at 2nd Stage, "The Sum of Us" at the Cherry Lane Theater, for which he earned an Obie Award and "Digby" at the Manhattan Theater Club. He last appeared on Broadway starring in the hit revival of the musical "Promises, Promises." He also dedicates much of his personal time to philanthropic work. Goldwyn serves as an Ambassador for Stand Up To Cancer and a board member for the humanitarian relief organization Americares. Additionally, he is a Trustee for Second Stage Theater, sits on the MPTF Foundation Board of Governors as well as the Board of Trustees at the Innocence Project. (10/2019)
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  • Hume CronynActor

  • Jake WeberActor

    Jake Weber has worked in film, theatre and television. His film credits include Zach Snyder's remake of Dawn of the Dead, Martin Brest's remake of Meet Joe Black, Jonathan Mostow's U-571, Mike Newell's Pushing Tin, Tarsem Singh's The Cell, Marshall Herskovitz's Dangerous Beauty, Alan J. Pakula's The Pelican Brief, Sidney Lumet's A Stranger Among Us, and Larry Fessendon's Wendigo. His first job was in Oliver Stone's Born on the 4th of July. Most recently, he can be seen in Learning to Drive opposite Patricia Clarkson as well as Terrence Malick's Song to Song. He was a series regular on Mind of the Married Man (HBO), American Gothic (CBS), Something Wilder (CBS), starring Gene Wilder, and, for 7 years, Medium (NBC), starring Patricia Arquette. Jake recurred in 2 seasons of Hell on Wheels, and guested in Joe Swanberg's Easy for Netflix as well as Secrets and Lies on ABC. Most recently, he has a series regular on Homeland. A theatre veteran, he has appeared extensively on and off Broadway and regionally at Williamstown Theatre Festival and Arena Stage. He attended Juilliard in New York City, A.S. Neil's Summerhill School in England, Middlebury College in Vermont, where he studied English and Political Science, and The Moscow Art Theatre in the then Soviet Union. He was born in London. Weber has one son, Waylon, born in 2006. In 2017, he married his longtime partner, Korri Culbertson Weber.
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  • James B SikkingActor