Set deep in the wilds of Appalachia, where believers handle death-dealing snakes to prove themselves before God, Them That Follow tells the story of a pastor's daughter who holds a secret that threatens to tear her community apart.

  • Jun 21, 2019
  • Suspense

Cast & Crew

  • WALTON GOGGINS

    WALTON GOGGINSActor

    In the past few years, Walton Goggins has had pivotal roles in films by two of Hollywood's most important auteurs: Quentin Tarantino and Steven Spielberg. His integral role as 'Chris Mannix,' a southern renegade who claims to be the new sheriff of Red Rock in Tarantino's THE HATEFUL EIGHT, marks his second collaboration with the Academy Award-winning writer/director. He previously played slave fight trainer 'Billy Crash' in Tarantino's 2012 DJANGO UNCHAINED. The same year, Goggins also appeared in Steven Spielberg's LINCOLN, where he portrayed Congressman 'Wells A. Hutchins.' Walton was born in Birmingham, Alabama, to Janet and Walton Sanders Goggins. He was raised in Lithia Springs, Georgia. For more than a decade, Goggins has been one of the most magnetic and intense actors on television. He received an Emmy® nomination and four Critics Choice Award nominations for his mesmerizing portrayal of 'Boyd Crowder' on FX's Peabody Award-winning Drama series "Justified," which ran for six seasons. Goggins' 'Boyd' was the long-time friend, yet ultimate nemesis to U.S. Marshal 'Raylan Givens' (Timothy Olyphant). Elmore Leonard, executive producer and writer of the short story "Fire in the Hole" on which the show is based, says of 'Boyd,' "There has never been a more poetic bad guy on television in the way that he sees the world." "Justified" completed its sixth and final season this past year. Goggins' critical turn as the complex transgender prostitute 'Venus Van Dam' on the FX drama series "Sons of Anarchy" earned him two Critics Choice Award nominations and helped shed a fresh light on the transgender community. The role reunited Goggins with series creator Kurt Sutter, who was also a writer on "The Shield." He previously garnered much acclaim for his complex and edgy portrayal of 'Detective Shane Vendrell' on FX's gritty, award-winning drama series "The Shield," which ran for seven seasons. He was nominated for a Television Critics Association (TCA) Award in the category of "Individual Achievement in Drama." Goggins' impressive resume includes dozens of films, having worked with the likes of Robert Duvall and Anthony Hopkins. His recent feature credits include such diverse films as AMERICAN ULTRA, G.I. JOE: RISE OF THE COBRA, Robert Rodriguez's PREDATORS and MACHETE KILLS, Jon Favreau's COWBOYS & ALIENS, and Rod Lurie's STRAW DOGS. He has also taken his turn behind the camera. Goggins' collaborations with his partners at Ginny Mule Pictures include winning an Academy Award® for their 2001 short film, THE ACCOUNTANT, which he produced and starred in. The team produced, directed and starred in their first feature, CHRYSTAL, starring Billy Bob Thornton, which was accepted into the 2005 Sundance Film Festival's Dramatic Competition. For their third collaboration, Goggins produced and starred in the feature RANDY AND THE MOB, which won the Audience Award for Best Feature at the 2007 Nashville Film Festival. Goggins and his Ginny Mule partners completed their fourth feature, THAT EVENING SUN, starring Hal Holbrook and Goggins. The film made its world premiere at the South By Southwest (SXSW) Film Festival in Austin, TX in March 2009, where it won the Narrative Feature Audience Award and received the Special Jury Award for "Best Ensemble Cast." The film continued winning awards at over 14 film festivals, culminating with the honor of the "Wyatt Award" from the Southeastern Film Critics Association (SEFCA) and two Independent Spirit Award nominations. Goggins starred in the feature "The Three Christs of Ypsilanti," in which he plays the role of 'Christ.' The story follows a doctor (Richard Gere) who is treating paranoid schizophrenic patients at the Ypsilanti State Hospital in Michigan, each of whom believe they are Jesus Christ. Jon Avnet directed from a script he wrote with Eric Nazarian, adapted from the biographical novel by Milton Rokeach. He completed production on a starring role in HISTORY's "Six," an 8-episode contemporary military action drama from A+E Studios and The Weinstein Company. Inspired by current events, the project is about an elite team of Navy SEALs whose 2014 mission to eliminate a Taliban leader in Afghanistan goes awry when they uncover a U.S. citizen working with the terrorists. Goggins plays 'Rip Taggart,' the one-time leader of the SEAL team SIX squad who patrols an African village to protect its residents from Boko Haram. Goggins stars opposite Danny McBride in the HBO series "Vice Principals." Created by McBride and Jody Hill, who also created "Eastbound & Down," "Vice Principals" is a dark comedy about a high school and the two people who almost run it, the vice principals. McBride and Goggins star as the V.P.'s who are in an epic power struggle, vying for the top spot: to be school principal. The show premiered at the 2016 SXSW Film Festival and won the Episodic Audience Award. Season Two had its debut in 2017.
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  • OLIVIA COLMAN

    OLIVIA COLMANActor

  • KAITLYN DEVER

    KAITLYN DEVERActor

  • Cast Image

    LEIGH THOMAS MANNActor

  • ALICE ENGLERT

    ALICE ENGLERTActor

  • JIM GAFFIGAN

    JIM GAFFIGANActor

    Indiana native Jim Gaffigan arrived in New York City in 1990 at the age of 24. Officially, he had relocated to work in advertising, but his real fascination with New York had a lot more to do with pursuing his dream of making people laugh as an actor and stand-up comic, a dream he would eventually realize through hard work and ample talent. Hailing from a clan of conservative Midwestern bankers, young Gaffigan had virtually no contacts or connections in the entertainment industry. In a 2006 interview for The Onion's AV Club, Gaffigan told journalist and film critic Noel Murray he came from "a conservative family where you're driven by security, and wearing a tie to work is considered a success. My uncle was the first one to go to college and, at that point, we'd been in this country for 150 years. It took us five generations to get to the middle class, and I was like, "Hey, I think I'm gonna go into the entertainment world!" Everybody was like, "Are you nuts?" Gaffigan proved his comic merit and steadily climbed the ladder to stand-up success, eventually landing an appearance on fellow Hoosier David Letterman's talk show Late Show with David Letterman (1993). The gap-toothed late night yukmeister was so impressed by Gaffigan's first appearance that he handpicked him to develop a sitcom for the Letterman-owned production company World Wide Pants. The fruit of this union, a sitcom entitled Welcome to New York (2000), was canceled shortly into its initial run despite critical acclaim. Fortunately, the stand-up artiste's career was very far from over. He went on to guest-star on a veritable who's who list of hit shows including That '70s Show (1998), Sex and the City (1998), Third Watch (1999), Ed (2000) and Law & Order (1990). According to the aforementioned Noel Murray, the demise of Welcome to New York (2000) also had a cathartic effect on Gaffigan's stand-up routine. "His observational humor lost a lot of its initial peevishness, and it now relies on his hyper-awareness of his own mundanity, expressed in an 'inner voice' that comments on his act throughout the show," wrote Murray in early 2006, referring to Gaffigan's signature habit of reading his audience's mind in a gut-bustingly tremulous falsetto. Whatever the future holds for Mr. Gaffigan, all fans of good and original comedy are just happy that he is alive and well and making us pee our pants.
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Cast & Crew photos provided by TMDb.

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