Insidious: The Last Key

1 hr 43 min

PG13

Fear comes home.

The creative minds behind the hit Insidious trilogy return for INSIDIOUS: THE LAST KEY. In the supernatural thriller, which welcomes back franchise standout Lin Shaye as Dr. Elise Rainier, the brilliant parapsychologist faces her most fearsome and personal haunting yet: in her own family home. The film is written by co-creator Leigh Whannell (Saw), who wrote the trilogy and directed Chapter 3; produced by Insidious regulars Jason Blum (The Purge series, Get Out), Oren Peli (Paranormal Activity) and co-creator James Wan (The Conjuring, Furious 7); and directed by series newcomer Adam Robitel (The Taking of Deborah Logan).

  • Pre-show and trailers run for approximately 20 minutes before the movie starts.1 hr 43 minPG13
  • Horror
Promotional image for Insidious: The Last Key

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Cast & Crew

  • Lin Shaye

    Lin ShayeElise Rainier

    Lin attended the University of Michigan, where she was an Art History major, although acting in as many University productions as possible, including "Bye Bye Birdie" and "On The Town". After U of M, she attended Columbia University School of the Arts, and acquired a Master of Fine Arts degree in Acting. She stayed in New York upon graduation and worked in numerous off- and off-off- Broadway productions, as well as Lincoln Center and Broadway. She has studied with some of the finest: Uta Hagen, Stella Adler and Lee Strasberg. Lin is a lifetime member of the Actors Studio.
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  • SPENCER LOCKE

    SPENCER LOCKEMelissa Rainier

    Born in 1991 in Winter Park, Florida, Spencer began to show an interest in the arts at a young age. When asked in school to draw what she would be when she got older, 6 year old Spencer drew herself on-stage with a star over her head. Two years later, she had enrolled in acting classes and immediately started booking numerous television commercials in the Orlando, Florida area. With sights set high, 11 year-old Spencer and family set off to Los Angeles to pursue her dreams. Within a year's time, she booked a guest starring role on CBS's "Without A Trace" and a role in Sony Pictures' feature film "Spanglish". Shortly thereafter, Spencer began recurring as "Bitsy" on the Nickelodeon series "Ned's Declassified School Survival Guide". In 2004, Spencer stole the hearts of producers Robert Zemeckis, Steven Speilberg and director Gil Kenan and won the lead role of "Jenny" in Sony Pictures / Imagemovers' feature film, "Monster House". This was one of the first "Motion Capture" films of the time. She was nominated for an Annie Award for her role role as "Jenny". At 14 years of age, Spencer booked the lead role of "K-Mart" in "Resident Evil: Extinction". Her character lived to see the 4th installment, "Resident Evil: Afterlife", which was released in 2010. Spencer has guest starred in numerous television shows throughout this time such as "Cougar Town", " In Plain Sight", "Vampire Diaries", "Cold Case", and "Love Bites". She most recently filmed a movie for Lifetime called "Bling Ring", which airs this summer. In 2008, Spencer filmed an independent mini-series called "Twentysixmiles" which is looking for distribution. Spencer has also had the opportunity to be a part of a couple of independent films such as "Karaoke Man", and has a lead role in Joseph Kahn's "Detention", which has recently been acquired by Sony Films for worldwide distribution. Spencer lives in Los Angeles with her family and looks forward to a bright future.
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  • JOSH STEWART

    JOSH STEWARTGerald Rainier

    Joshua Regnall Stewart was born in Diana, West Virginia, to Margie (Skidmore) and Charles Regnall Stewart, a teacher and Baptist pastor. He studied at the T. Schreiber studios in New York City and was a company member of the 13th Street Repertory Theatre. He continued his work in theater in Los Angeles performing in 'Light Bulb,' and 'Beacon' alongside 'Robert Forster' and Brooke Shields. He is a competitive snowboarder and boxer.
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  • Bruce Davison

    Bruce DavisonChristian Rainier

    With his blond, clean-cut, Ivy League handsomeness and ready-whipped smile reminiscent of Kennedyesque times, actor Bruce Davison fits the prototype of today's more current crop of fresh-faced, likable blonds such as Brian Kerwin and Aaron Eckhart. While it proved difficult at times for the actor to get past those perfect features and find meatier roles, his talent certainly overcame the "handicap". Extremely winning and versatile, the award-worthy actor, now enjoying an over four decade career, has included everything from Shakespeare to Seinfeld. He has also served as a writer, producer and director on an infrequent basis. Born on June 28, 1946, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvanis, the son of Clair, an architect and musician, and Marian (Holman) Davison, a secretary, Bruce's parents divorced when he was just three. He developed a burgeoning interest in acting while majoring in art at Penn State and after accompanying a friend to a college theater audition. Making his professional stage debut in 1966 as Jonathan in "Oh Dad, Poor Dad, Mama's Hung You in the Closet and I'm Feelin' So Bad" at the Pennsylvania Festival Theatre, he had made it to Broadway within just a couple of years (1968) in the role of Troilus in "Tiger at the Gates" at the Vivian Beaumont Theatre. The year after that he was seen off-Broadway in "A Home Away from Home" and appeared at the Lincoln Center in the cast of "King Lear". Success in the movies came immediately for the perennially youthful-looking actor after he and a trio of up-and-coming talents (Barbara Hershey [then known as Barbara Seagull], Richard Thomas and Catherine Burns) starred together in the poignant but disturbing coming-of-age film Last Summer (1969). From this he was awarded a starring role opposite Kim Darby in The Strawberry Statement (1970), an offbeat social commentary about 60s college radicalism, and in the cult horror flick Willard (1971) in which he bonded notoriously with a herd of rats. Moving further into the 70s decade, his film load did not increase significantly as expected and the ones he did appear in were no great shakes. With the exception of his co-starring role alongside Burt Lancaster in the well-made cavalry item Ulzana's Raid (1972) and the powerful low-budget Short Eyes (1977) in which he played a child molester, Bruce was surprisingly ill-used or underused. Insignificant as the elder Patrick Dennis in the inferior Lucille Ball musical film version of Mame (1974), he was just as overlooked in such movies as The Jerusalem File (1972), Mother, Jugs & Speed (1976), Grand Jury (1976) and Brass Target (1978). Bruce wisely looked elsewhere for rewarding work and found it on the stage and on the smaller screen. Earning strong theatrical roles in "The Skin of Our Teeth," "The Little Foxes" and "A Life in the Theatre," he won the Los Angeles Drama Critics Award for his work in "Streamers" in 1977. On TV, he scored in mini-movie productions of Mourning Becomes Electra (1978), Deadman's Curve (1978) (portraying Dean Torrence of the surf-era pop duo Jan and Dean) and, most of all, Summer of My German Soldier (1978) co-starring Kristy McNichol as a German prisoner of war in the American South who falls for a lonely Jewish-American girl. In 1972 Bruce married actress Jess Walton who appeared briefly as a college student in The Strawberry Statement (1970) and later became a daytime soap opera fixture. The marriage was quickly annulled the following year. The 1980s was also dominated by strong theater performances. Bruce took over the role of the severely deformed John Merrick as "The Elephant Man" on Broadway; portrayed Clarence in "Richard III" at the New York Shakespeare Festival; was directed by Henry Fonda in "The Caine Mutiny Court Martial"; played a moving Tom Wingfield opposite Jessica Tandy's Amanda in "The Glass Menagerie"; received a second Los Angeles Drama Critics Award for his work in the AIDS play "The Normal Heart"; and finished off the decade gathering up fine reviews in the amusing A.R. Gurney period piece "The Cocktail Hour". While hardly lacking for work on film (Summer Heat (1982), Crimes of Passion (1984), Spies Like Us (1985), and The Ladies Club (1986)), few of them made use of his talents and range. It was not until he was cast in the ground-breaking gay drama Longtime Companion (1989) that his film career revitalized. Giving a quiet, finely nuanced, painfully tender performance as the middle-aged lover and caretaker of a life partner ravaged by AIDS, Bruce managed to stand out amid the strong ensemble cast and earn himself an Oscar nomination for "Best Supporting Actor". Although he lost out to the flashier antics of Joe Pesci in the mob drama Goodfellas (1990) that year, Bruce was not overlooked -- copping Golden Globe, Independent Spirit, New York Film Critics and National Society of Film Critics awards. Other gay-themed films also welcomed his presence, including The Cure (1995) and It's My Party (1996). The actor eventually served as a spokesperson for a host of AIDS-related organizations, including Hollywood Supports, and, elsewhere, is active with foundations that help children who are abused. Bruce has been all over the screen since his success in Longtime Companion (1989). Predominantly seen as mature, morally responsible dads and politicians, his genial good looks and likability have on occasion belied a weak or corrupt heart. Bruce married actress Lisa Pelikan in 1986 (well over a decade after his first marriage ended) and they have one son, Ethan, born in 1996. The handsome couple became well known around town and worked frequently together on stage ("The Downside," "Love Letters," "Breaking the Silence," "To Kill a Mockingbird") and in TV movies (Color of Justice (1997)). Bruce's more popular films these days have included Six Degrees of Separation (1993) starring Will Smith, the family adventure film Far from Home: The Adventures of Yellow Dog (1995) and the box-office hit X-Men (2000) and its sequel in the role of Senator Kelly. More controversial art-house showcases include Dahmer (2002), as serial killer Jeffrey Dahmer's father, and Hate Crime (2005), as a bigoted, murderous pastor. Bruce has attempted TV series leads in later years. With Harry and the Hendersons (1991), he ably directed a number of the show's episodes. He has also been tapped for recurring parts on The Practice (1997) and The L Word (2004), and is fondly remembered for his comedy episodes on Seinfeld (1989) as an attorney who goes for George's (Jason Alexander) throat when George's fiancée dies inexplicably of toxic poisoning. The actor recently completed a TV series revival of Knight Rider (2008). Divorced from Lisa Pelikan, Bruce is married these days to third wife Michele Correy and has a daughter by her, Sophia, born in 2006. They live in the Los Angeles area.
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  • KIRK ACEVEDO

    KIRK ACEVEDOTed Garza

    Born and raised in the Bronx, and spent most of his formative years hanging out in New York City, Kirk Acevedo, who is of Puerto Rican descent, received his BFA from SUNY Purchase and founded a theater company called The Rorschach Group. After guest-starring on several television shows like New York Undercover (1994) and Law & Order (1990), he landed his best-known role as Alvarez, a morose and violent prisoner struggling for redemption on HBO's notoriously gritty Oz (1997). Though he was nominated for a Cable Ace award and an ALMA award for his work on Oz (1997), it was Acevedo's role as Pvt. Tella in The Thin Red Line (1998) that won him an ALMA.
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  • Leigh Whannell

    Leigh WhannellSpecs

    Leigh Whannell grew up in Melbourne, Australia, where, at the age of four, he developed an obsession with telling stories. Whether it be through acting, writing or filmmaking, his primary love was getting a reaction from an audience. In 1995, at the age of 18, he was accepted into the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology's prestigious Media Arts course, where he met fellow filmmaker James Wan. In his second year of college, he landed the role of "film guy" on a Saturday morning TV show aimed at teens called Recovery (1996). Filmed totally live in the studio and hosted by actual teenagers, the ground-breaking show was hugely popular down under and was the first to bring "alternative culture" to Australia's TV screens, featuring live performances from bands like Sonic Youth, Weezer, Public Enemy, Ben Harper, Pulp and hundreds more. Hosting the film component of the show, Leigh was lucky enough to interview people like Tim Burton, Peter Jackson, Russell Crowe, George Clooney, and eventually went on the host the show in 1999. After graduating from college, Leigh found himself working more and more as a "host" or "presenter" on Australian TV - all the while hatching a plan with James Wan to finally fulfill his dream of making a film. Small acting roles cropped up from time to time (including one in The Matrix Reloaded (2003), which Leigh has said was "the most fun I've ever had in my life") and, along with those, some frustrating near-misses (and not so near-misses: like his cringe-inducing audition for "Lord Of The Rings", in which he paid $90 to have "hobbit ears" grafted onto his head, turning up at the casting office dressed as a hobbit - needless to say he didn't get the role). However, it was missing out on a role in Alex Proyas Australian film Garage Days (2002) that finally broke the camel's back. He called Wan and told him that if they wanted to get a film made, they would have to pay for it themselves. Saw (2004) was born. After nine months of writing, Leigh had written the screenplay for what he thought would be a self-financed, "Blair Witch"-style feature, with him starring and James directing. The script gained so much attention that soon enough, they were shopping it around Hollywood....and the rest is history.
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Cast & Crew photos provided by TMDb.

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