Loyal, Brave, True.

MULAN is the epic adventure of a fearless young woman who masquerades as a man in order to fight Northern Invaders attacking China. The eldest daughter of an honored warrior, Hua Mulan is spirited, determined and quick on her feet. When the Emperor issues a decree that one man per family must serve in the Imperial Army, she steps in to take the place of her ailing father as Hua Jun, becoming one of China's greatest warriors ever.

  • 1 hr 55 minPG13HDSD
  • Sep 4, 2020
  • Adventure

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Cast & Crew

  • Donnie YenCommander Tung

    Donnie Yen was born in Guangzhou, China. His mother, Bow-sim Mark, was a kung fu master and his father, Kylster Yen, a newspaper editor and amateur musician. When Donnie was just two years old, the family moved to Hong Kong and then, when he was 11, to Boston, Massachusetts. There, Master Bow-sim Mark became a pioneer for Chinese martial arts in America, and it was only natural that her only son was trained from early childhood in the same skills. At the same time, Donnie was influenced by his parents' love of music and reached a high level of proficiency as a pianist. All these interests would have a manifest influence on Yen's later life. In his teens, Donnie defined his own persona by rebelling against his parents edicts. Beyond the limitations of his mother's school, Yen began training in various different fighting arts, including Japanese karate, Korean taekwondo and western boxing. Donnie also took up hip-hop and break-dancing. At the same time, he began spending his nights in Boston's notorious Combat Zone. Given that he was by now a serious practitioner of modern Wu Shu, his parents decided to send him to Beijing to train at the Chinese capital's famed Wu Shu academy. It was when Yen returned to Hong Kong en route back to Boston that he met the famed martial arts movie director Yuen Woo-ping. Donnie exploded onto the Hong Kong movie scene when he was cast in the lead role of director Yuen Woo-ping's 'Drunken Tai Chi'. His debut film immediately established him as a viable leading man, and Yen has remained a major figure in Chinese action cinema to this day. Yen skills as a street dancer were to the fore in his second starring role, 'Mismatched Couples', in which he showed off his breakdance moves, as well as his general athleticism. This slapstick romantic comedy was produced by Hong Kong's prestigious Cinema City studio. Donnie was subsequently signed by the newly formed D&B Films, and cast in the hit cop actioner 'Tiger Cage'. In this movie, and his follow-up features for the company ('In the Line of Duty 4', 'Tiger Cage 2'), Yen showed off his own unique form of contemporary screen combat, a form that included elements of rapid fire kicking, Western boxing and grappling moves. Having established a worldwide fan base, Yen moved on to star in a string of independent Asian action features before director Tsui Hark tapped him to co-star in 'Once Upon A Time In China 2'. The film's two action highlights saw Donnie's character duel the legendary martial arts master Wong Fei-hung, played by his old friend Jet Li. The film brought Yen his first real attention as a thespian and he was nominated in the Best Supporting Actor category at that year's Hong Kong Film Awards. Tsui Hark went on to produce a remake of King Hu's classic 'New Dragon Inn', which provided another showcase role for Donnie as the film's apparently invincible villain. Donnie was reunited with director Yuen Woo-ping for 'Iron Monkey', a film which brought Yen's acting and action skills both into focus. In 'Iron Monkey', Yen played the father of Wong Fei-hung, and its success prefigured that which he would later enjoy as another pugilistic patriarch in 'Ip Man'. Donnie collaborated with Yuen on the action for the film, designing a new on-screen interpretation of Wong Fei-hung's classic 'Shadowless Kick'. 'Iron Monkey' was all the more remarkable in that, years after its Asian release, it was acquired by the American studio Miramax, re-cut, re-scored and given a wide release in US theatres. After premieres in New York and Los Angeles, the film enjoyed great acclaim from the American critics, and won a prize at that year's Taurus Awards, an event held to celebrate action in cinema. After working on a number of independent features, Yen went on to enjoy huge success on the small screen when he accepted a lucrative offer from Hong Kong's ATV to film a series based on the Bruce Lee classic 'Fist of Fury'. The show was the top-rated action drama show around the region, and was subsequently re-edited for international distribution on video. Donnie went on to make his directorial debut with 'Legend of the Wolf', a stylish period actioner that even attracted the attention of legendary American film-maker Francis Coppola. The film, about an amnesiac warrior returning to his home village, has become a bona fide cult classic. As director, Donnie followed 'Legend of the Wolf' with a very different venture, 'Ballistic Kiss', an urban thriller about a conflicted assassin. The film played at the prestigious Udine Festival in Italy, and took home awards at several other events, including the Japanese Yubari International Action Film Festival. Donnie's body of work had by then attracted the attention of Hollywood, and Yen was approached to choreograph the action for the mainstream franchise films 'Highlander: Endgame' and 'Blade 2'. After a period where he was based in Los Angeles, Donnie returned East by way of the West when Jackie Chan requested that Yen play his nemesis in the hit 'Shanghai Knights', a shoot that took the star from Prague to London. Yen returned to China to co-star in director Zhang Yimou's epic wu xia master work 'Hero'. Yen's duel with Jet Li brought his skills to the emerging Mainland Chinese theatrical audience, and paved the way for Donnie to become the country's biggest action star. The film received a wide US theatrical release from Miramax, and remains one of the most successful foreign language titles ever distributed in the America market. Donnie returned to Hong Kong to choreograph the smash hit fantasy-horror-comedy 'The Twins Effect', and went on to enjoy his most productive partnership with a director. Beginning with the cop actioner 'SPL', Donnie teamed with helmer Wilson Yip for a series of very different films that Yen would star in and action choreograph and Yip would direct. Star and director subsequently teamed to create the comic book inspired fantasy actioner 'Dragon Tiger Gate' and the gritty police thriller 'Flashpoint', in which Donnie created what fans feel is the definitive on-screen MMA action scene. Yen was to return to this hard-hitting, urban action style for the later 'Special ID'. Donnie now found himself in demand as a leading man in a series of prestigious period actioners produced for the Chinese market. 'Seven Swords' premiered at the Venice Film Festival, and proved a hit with worldwide audiences. The film was released in North America by The Weinstein Company's Dragon Dynasty label, and remains its biggest hit. Yen also attracted rave reviews when he played an honorable general in 'An Empress and her Warriors' and an offbeat ghost-buster in Gordon Chan's 'Painted Skin'. Yen took his career to a new level when he accepted producer Raymond Wong's suggestion that he play Bruce Lee's teacher, 'Ip Man', in an eponymous film relating the life of the great master. The film was a huge success in Hong Kong and China, and 'Ip Man' went on to find favor with audiences worldwide. Donnie also received a Best Actor nomination at the Hong Kong Film Awards. 'Ip Man' confirmed Donnie's position as China's greatest action hero, and he was immediately signed to lead a strong ensemble cast for Teddy Chen's 'Bodyguards and Assassins', produced by Peter Chan. Besides his on-screen performance, Donnie was also called on to choreograph the dynamic duel between himself and MMA champion Cung Le. The movie went on to sweep the board at the Hong Kong Film Awards winning Best Film, among many other prizes. Yen himself was nominated for Best Actor at the Chinese Hundred Flower awards. Yen followed this with 'Ip Man 2', a rare example of a sequel that proved a match for its predecessor. The film followed Ip's life journey to Hong Kong, where he faces both rival kung fu masters, led by the film's choreographer, Sammo Hung, and a brutal foreign boxer, portrayed by the late Darren Shahlavi. 'Ip Man 2' was the biggest local hit of the year in China, and enjoyed a limited theatrical release in the US. The film's success led to Donnie being cast as a number of legendary Chinese heroes: He played General Qin-long in Daniel Lee's '14 Blades', Guan Yu in 'The Lost Bladesman' and reprised Bruce Lee's Chen Zhen role in Andrew Lau's 'Legend of the Fist'. Yen also used the lighter side of his screen persona to good effect in two installments of the hit Hong Kong comedy movie series 'Alls Well Ends Well'. Yen was cast opposite Tang Wei and Takeshi Kaneshiro in director Peter Chan's 'Wu Xia' (aka 'Dragon'), a dark, elegant period martial arts murder mystery. The film premiered to great acclaim at the 2011 Cannes Film Festival, and subsequently received a North American theatrical release from The Weinstein Company. Donnie Yen played 'The Monkey King' in a hit reimagining of the Chinese classic. Donnie starred opposite screen legend Chow Yun-fat in the film, which smashed box office records in Mainland China. Showing his versatility, Yen went on to play a kung fu master facing challenges in the modern era in director Teddy Chen's 'Kung Fu Jungle'. The movie, which premiered at the London Film Festival, paid tribute to the great history of Hong Kong martial arts cinema. During the shooting of his ambitious, time travel themed action fantasy 'Iceman 3D', Yen was approached to revitalize the greatest brand in the history of Chinese martial arts cinema. 'Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon: Sword of Destiny' was shot primarily on location in New Zealand, with Yen in the lead role. The world class creative team gathered by producer Harvey Weinstein included legendary kung fu film director Yuen Woo-ping, acclaimed directors Peter Berg and Morten Tyldum (as producers), 'X-Men' series DP Tom Sigel as well as the Oscar-winning production, costume and FX designers from the 'Lord of the Rings' and 'Hobbit' film series. The film debuted in most international territories as a Netflix Original movie, making it the most widely seen wu xia of all time. 'Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon: The Sword of Destiny' also played at selected Imax theatres in North America, and enjoyed a wide theatrical release in China, where it was screened in its 3D version. Yen reteamed with his former mentor Yuen Woo-ping for the hugely popular 'Ip Man 3'. The film, with Wilson Ip as director and Yuen as choreographer, pitted the title character against legendary boxing champion Mike Tyson. The film out-performed all the previous movies featuring the character of Ip Man, smashing box office records throughout Asia. Following a high profile Los Angeles premiere, 'Ip Man 3' enjoyed a Los Angeles premiere and a US theatrical release, earning rave reviews in the mainstream American media. Having conquered every territory beneath the Asian skies, Donnie accepted an invitation to join the cast of an entry in the world's biggest film franchise. In 'Rogue One: A Star Wars Story', Yen plays one of the Rebel warriors responsible for the theft of the Death Star plans, the adventure that, within the 'Star Wars' universe, leads to the events of the very first film in the series. The film was shot primarily at the famed Elstree Studios in England. Donnie had a role opposite Vin Diesel and his fellow Asian action star, Tony Jaa, in xXx: Return of Xander Cage (2017), which filmed in Toronto, Canada. Now firmly established as a leading player across the globe, Donnie Yen continues to present a unique blend of Eastern experience and Western innovation, of musical grace with martial impact, from Hong Kong to a galaxy far, far away.... Donnie is one of the leading martial arts choreographers in the world of action cinema. His skills behind the camera began developing from his early days in the industry, and he was very much involved with the action choreography of his films for D&B Films. He received his first full action directing credit on the Michelle Yeoh, kung fu drama 'Wing Chun', in which he also starred. Yen further developed his style of choreography in the high pressure world of Hong Kong television, where he created the action for his hit series 'Kung Fu Master' and 'Fist of Fury', and as a low-budget film-maker, when he directed, starred in and choreographed the movies 'Legend of the Wolf' and 'Ballistic Kiss'. It was after Yen had helmed his first two Chinese features that Hollywood made its first serious bid for his services. He was signed to co-star in and action direct 'Highlander: Endgame', the latest in a series of fantasy actioners. The film, which starred Adrian Paul and Christopher Lambert, was produced by the US studio Dimension, and enjoyed a successful worldwide theatrical release. Having relocated to Los Angeles, Yen paid his dues by directing action scenes for the Dimension action thriller 'Stormbreaker' and providing the fight sequences for the German TV series 'The Puma'. Donnie agreed to both action direct and cameo in the major New Line action franchise entry 'Blade 2', starring Wesley Snipes. The film, directed by Guillermo del Toro, was a huge hit, earning almost twice the box office of the original 'Blade'. Returning to Hong Kong, Yen found he now had a major contribution to make behind the camera, co-directing the SFX action adventure 'The Twins Effect'. The film, which starred two of China's top pop idols, told the tale of young vampire hunters with well-honed martial arts skills. A huge hit for Emperor, the film earned Yen his first Best Action Director prize at the Hong Kong Film Awards. 'The Twins Effect' saw Donnie start to introduce elements of MMA (Mixed Martial Arts) in his film fight scenes. He took the on-screen depiction of the style to new heights with the film 'SPL', released in the US as 'Kill Zone'. Yen's final reel duel with Sammo Hung is now regarded as a classic of the genre. The film won Donnie his second Best Action Choreography prize at the Hong Kong Film Awards. He took his on-screen depiction of MMA to new heights in 'Flashpoint', which featured an even longer and more intense final showdown, this time between Yen and 'Matrix Reloaded' actor Collin Chou. The film won Donnie his third Best Action Choreography prize at the Hong Kong Film Awards, as well as a prize for Best Action in a Foreign Language Film at the Taurus Awards. Yen explored different styles of screen combat when he choreographed the stunning kung fu fights for the period actioners 'Legend of the Fist' and 'The Lost Bladesman', the fantasy combat for 'The Monkey King' and the time travel adventure 'Iceman Cometh 3D'. Many fans feel that Yen delivered his best choreographic work to date in Peter Chan's masterful 'Wu Xia', released in the US as 'Dragon'. The film saw Donnie bring his own unique flair to classical Shaw Bros style kung fu action. Donnie brought traditional Chinese martial arts into the modern era with 'Kung Fu Jungle', for which his work won yet another Best Choreography prize at the Hong Kong Film Awards. Away from the cameras, Yen entered into the most rewarding partnership of his life when he married former beauty queen, Cissy Wang. The couple now has two children, a girl and boy, Jasmine and James.
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  • Li GongXianniang

    Born in Shenyang, grew up in Jinan, the daughter of an economics professor. Loved music from childhood, and dreamed of a singing career. After failing to gain entrance to China's top music school in 1985, applied for and was admitted to the Central Drama Academy in Beijing, from which she graduated in 1989. While still a student, was cast as the female lead in Red Sorghum (1988)(aka "Red Sorghum"), the initial directing effort by Yimou Zhang. China's best-known actress in the West, she was named Best Actress at the 49th Venice International Film Festival for her role in The Story of Qiu Ju (1992) (aka "The Story of Qiu Ju"). Made a series of successful films with Yimou Zhang, a collaboration that apparently ended with the breakup of their personal relationship in 1995 and Gong's subsequent marriage to a tobacco company executive.
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  • Yifei LiuMulan

    Liu Yifei Born in Wuhan, Hubei province of China 1987 August 25th, She began modeling at the age of 8 and was trained in singing, dancing and the piano. Moving to the United States at 10 with her mother, Liu lived there for four years. She returned to China in June 2002 to pursue a modeling and acting career. In September 2002, she was accepted into the Performance Institute of Beijing Film Academy at the tender age 15. Her first television role was in The Story of a Noble Family. Shortly after, she was chosen to portray the role of Wang Yuyan in Demi-Gods and Semi-Devils, a drama based on the same-titled novel by the acclaimed martial arts writer, Jinyong. In October 2003, Liu marked her first appearance on the big screen collaboration with May Day, the well-known Taiwanese rock band in the movie Love Of May. Her fame and popularity went up another notch through her starring role in the 2004 drama series adaptation of the video game, The Legend of Sword and Fairy. Upon her graduation from the Beijing Film Academy in July 2006, Liu starred in another television production based on another book by Jinyong, The Return of the Condor Heroes. This TV series was very well received in mainland China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and Japan. Liu made her first foray into her music career in August 2005 when she secured a recording contract with Sony Music Entertainment Japan. After taking up singing and dancing lessons for a year, her album Liu Yifei was released regionally in mainland China, Taiwan, Hong Kong and throughout South-East Asia in August 2006, featuring a diverse music repertoire including rap and soft rock. In the same year, Liu also released her Japanese album in which the single, The Gate of Late Night, was chosen to be the theme for an animation series by Tokyo TV.
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  • Utkarsh AmbudkarSkatch

    Utkarsh Ambudkar was born on December 8, 1983 in Baltimore, Maryland, USA. He is an actor, known for Pitch Perfect (2012), The Mindy Project (2012) and Barbershop: The Next Cut (2016).
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  • Jet LIEmperor

    Jet Li born Li Lian Jie in Beijing, China. He started training at the Beijing wushu academy (wushu is China's national sport, largely a performance version of various martial art styles) at age eight. He won five gold medals in the Chinese championships, his first when he was only 11. In his teens, he was already a national coach, and before he was 20 he had starred in his first movie: Shaolin Temple (1982), which started the 1980s Kung-Fu boom in mainland China. He relocated to Hong Kong, where he was the biggest star of the early 1990s Kung-Fu boom. His first directorial effort was Born to Defense (1986).
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  • Jason Scott LeeBöri Khan

    Of Hawaiian and Chinese descent, Jason Scott Lee was born in Los Angeles, California, but raised in Hawaii from the age of two. His interest in acting began while studying in high school. It blossomed further when he enrolled in Fullerton College, where he studied under acting coach Sal Romeo. His first film role was in Born in East L.A. (1987). After taking many supporting roles, he took his star turn in Dragon: The Bruce Lee Story (1993). His next starring role was in The Jungle Book (1994). Though he has not yet panned out as a leading man, Jason continues to work in supporting roles while pursuing his interest in live theater.
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  • Rosalind ChaoLi

    Rosalind Chao is best known for The Joy Luck Club (1993), Star Trek, What Dreams May Come, and most recently The Laundromat (2019), and Plus One (2019). She was born and raised in Orange County, California where her parents ran a Chinese restaurant and pancake house. Rosalind first began appearing in commercials and television after having been spotted as a small child at her family restaurant. She had also trained and appeared on stage from an early age in the Peking Opera and Chinese dance. She continues to act in the theater, most recently starring in 2018 the National Theatre of Great Britain in a new play The Great Wave. She has been married to Simon Templeman since 1989. They have two children.
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  • Tzi MaZhou

    For more than four decades, Tzi Ma (pronounced "TAI MA") has blazed new trails for the representation of Asian Americans in Hollywood. Celebrated for his uncanny versatility, his body of work encompasses virtually every genre across film, television and theater. From big budget studio pictures like Disney's Mulan and the Rush Hour series to acclaimed independent films like The Farewell and Meditation Park, Ma's unforgettable performances have garnered unanimous critical acclaim and honors throughout his groundbreaking career. Long outspoken on issues of racism and media inclusivity, Ma has been a leading voice for the Asian American community. Despite the limited number of parts for actors of Asian descent during the early part of his career, Ma vehemently refused to perform roles that he considered demeaning or stereotypical. This unwavering stance helped kickstart a newfound consciousness in Hollywood that has transformed the way Asian American characters are portrayed. Born in Hong Kong and raised in Staten Island, Ma worked at a family-owned Chinese restaurant while honing his craft in the New York theater scene. During this period, he worked with then-emerging playwrights David Henry Hwang and Eric Overmyer; who both wrote plays specifically for Ma (The Dance and the Railroad and In Perpetuity Throughout the Universe, respectively). In 1978, Ma made his screen debut alongside Jack Palance and Andy Warhol in the cult classic Cocaine Cowboys directed by Ulli Lommel. Throughout the 1980s, Ma continued to perform in regional and off-Broadway productions while appearing as a guest star on hit television programs like The Cosby Show, The Equalizer, LA Law, MacGyver and Star Trek: The Next Generation. In the 1990s, Ma became a ubiquitous presence on the big screen with supporting roles in such major releases as Robocop 2, Rapid Fire, Chain Reaction, Dante's Peak and Rush Hour. As the new millennium began, Ma balanced a prolific film and television career in which he appeared in over 25 shows between 2000 and 2009, including NYPD Blue, ER, Law & Order and 24. During this time, Ma also began diversifying his roles on the silver screen with a range of unconventional characters. In addition to critically-praised performances in such prestige projects as Phillip Noyce's The Quiet American starring Michael Caine and Joel and Ethan Coen's The Ladykillers starring Tom Hanks, Ma also began appearing in independent features by up-and-coming Asian American and Asian Canadian filmmakers. Throughout the 2010s, Ma had scene-stealing roles in Million Dollar Arm, Arrival and The Farewell as well as recurring parts in major TV shows such as 24: Live Another Day, Hell on Wheels and The Man in the High Castle. He also branched out into voice work with roles on animated shows like American Dad! and video games like Sleeping Dogs. In 2017, the Academy of Canadian Cinema & Television nominated Ma for Best Actor in a Leading Role for his performance as a suspected philandering husband in Mina Shum's acclaimed drama Meditation Park. At the dawn of a new decade, Ma's continues to be in high demand as his career reaches unprecedented new heights. Recently, his performance as a dispassionate father and divorcee in Netflix's Tigertail earned him rave reviews from critics and audiences alike. Later this year, he'll be seen in one of his most high profile roles to date as the father of the titular character in Disney's action adventure Mulan.
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  • Ron YuanSergeant Qiang

    Ron Yuan just wrapped as one of the ensemble leads in Disney's live adaptation "Mulan" directed by Niki Caro. Yuan plays battle hardened Master Sgt. Qiang, 2nd in command of the Imperial Regiment. He stars with Donnie Yen, Jet Li, Gong Li, Jason S Lee and Crystal Liu. In the newly released "Mortal Kombat 11", Yuan plays the iconic Scorpion in the biggest fight franchise game in the world.. Yuan's directorial debut "Step Up China: Year of the Dance" will be released fall of 2019 through Wanda/Lionsgate/YueHua. The highly anticipated film will be the first of it's kind in China exploring youth from different social circles coming together to form China's top dance crew but more importantly what it takes to be a true family. In ABC/ Freeform's Siren, Yuan plays Aldon Decker, a military marine biologist who unwittingly falls in love with a predator mermaid. His obsession spirals out of control as he tries to bring her back to his research facility. Yuan signed on as series regular on the hit Netflix/ The Weinstein Company's "Marco Polo" created by John Fusco. Yuan plays Prince Nayan, a fiery eyed descendant of Genghis Khan. Nayan is a converted Christian that rules all of Manchuria and whose closely watched actions will affect Kublai's control of Asia. Yuan has been a force in front of and behind camera. Hollywood's secret weapon. Yuan is filming Roland Emmerich's Independence Day sequel (IDR) playing Yeong, the main weapons engineer. Before that, Yuan was on the "The Accountant" with Ben Affleck,JK Simmons and Anna Kendrick playing a reluctant Silat Master for "Warrior" director Gavin O'Connor. You can also see Yuan on Jon Bokenkamp's hit show "The Blacklist" as mysterious Blacklister Quon Zhang. Yuan was also seen in the final season of "Sons of Anarchy" as the intense and unpredictable Ryu Tom. Yuan cameos in Martin Scorsese's "Revenge of the Green Dragons" directed by Andrew Lau (Infernal Affairs) and Andrew Loo, playing the feared leader of the notorious BTK. Yuan played hard-nosed Lt. Peter Kang in the short lived CBS series "Golden Boy" from Nicholas Wootton and Greg Berlanti. Yuan also had recent cameo special guest appearances on"Castle" and "Justified". Yuan joins Francesca Eastwood and Annie Q in "MDMA" produced by Richard Bosner (Fruitvale Station) and Cassian Elwes in a semi- autobiographical film from first time director Angie Wang based on a college freshman in the 1980's who becomes an expert manufacturer and dealer of ecstasy. Yuan also played the iconic Japanese character Scorpion for Warner Bros' secret Mortal Kombat X "Generations" Yuan designed the fight sequences as well as going behind camera as Action Director for Steve Chasman/ Jason Statham's "Wild Card" scripted by William Goldman and directed by Simon West. Yuan just finished designing and directing the action on the popular Taiwanese/ Chinese/ International action franchise "PiZi Ying Xiong 2"(Black&White 2) shot all in Taiwan. In the past, Yuan was cast in a leading role on HBO pilot "All Signs of Death" opposite Ben Whishaw and Mahershala Ali, directed by Alan Ball (True Blood). Yuan recently had character arcs on FOX's "Touch" opposite Keifer Sutherland created by Tim Kring (Heroes), NBC's "Awake" opposite Jason Issacs and FOX pilot "Exit Strategy" with Ethan Hawke directed by Antoine Fuqua (Training Day). Yuan also had memorable turns on hit series and films (Prison Break, CSI:NY, 24, Burn Notice, NCIS:LA, Pushing Daisies, Entourage, Art of War, Fast and Furious, Cradle 2 the Grave, Blood and Bone, Red Dawn) as well as being the voice behind major gaming campaigns (Call of Duty-Black Ops 2, Halo, Star War's Old Republic, Resident Evil, World of Warcraft, Medal of Honor, Army of Two, Guild Wars 2, Deus Ex, Drake's Uncharted, and many more). Yuan's MiniFlix Films with Sony Television (SPE) co-produced three edgy graphic novel stylized films(Three Bullets, Tea and Remembrance, Lollipops) in which Yuan wrote, produced and directed. Yuan's award winning work in short film and features has premiered in over 30 festivals worldwide (including Toronto, Sundance, Tribeca, Greece, Egypt, Beijing, Macao, Newport, Texas, Seattle, Kansas City, Los Angeles and Comic Con). In development are Yuan's "Wind and Water" "Unspoken" "Cold" and twisted post-apocalyptic martial arts western "Forgotten 8" in which the latter pairs Alex Tse(Watchmen) as producer.
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  • Cheng Pei-PeiActor