On Plymouth Island, No One Ever Dies...Unless You Break the Rules

From the creative mind of Oscar nominee Steven Knight comes a daringly original, sexy, stylized thriller. Baker Dill (Academy Award winner Matthew McConaughey) is a fishing boat captain leading tours off a tranquil, tropical enclave called Plymouth Island. His quiet life is shattered, however, when his ex-wife Karen (Academy Award winner Anne Hathaway) tracks him down with a desperate plea for help. She begs Dill to save her – and their young son – from her new, violent husband (Jason Clarke) by taking him out to sea on a fishing excursion, only to throw him to the sharks and leave him for dead. Karen’s appearance thrusts Dill back into a life he’d tried to forget, and as he struggles between right and wrong, his world is plunged into a new reality that may not be all that it seems.

  • 1 hr 46 minR
  • Jan 25, 2019
  • Suspense

Cast & Crew

  • Anne Hathaway

    Anne HathawayKaren Zariakas

    Anne Jacqueline Hathaway was born in Brooklyn, New York, to Kate McCauley Hathaway, an actress, and Gerald T. Hathaway, a lawyer, both originally from Philadelphia. She is of mostly Irish descent, along with English, German, and French. Her first major role came in the short-lived television series Get Real (1999). She gained widespread recognition for her roles in The Princess Diaries (2001) and its 2004 sequel as a young girl who discovers she is a member of royalty, opposite Julie Andrews and Heather Matarazzo. She also had a notable role in Nicholas Nickleby (2002) opposite Charlie Hunnam and Jamie Bell, and a starring role in Ella Enchanted (2004). A former top-ranking soprano in New York, Hathaway was reportedly a front-runner for the role of "Christine" in the 2004 The Phantom of the Opera (2004). However, due to scheduling conflicts with The Princess Diaries 2: Royal Engagement (2004), she couldn't take the role, which was later given to newcomer Emmy Rossum. Hathaway soon started to move away from family-friendly films. Following The Princess Diaries 2: Royal Engagement (2004), she appeared topless in the films Havoc (2005) opposite Josh Peck and Brokeback Mountain (2005) opposite Heath Ledger and Jake Gyllenhaal. Her desire to break out of her "Princess Diaries" image parallels that of her one-time co-star, Julie Andrews, who went topless in the film S.O.B. (1981) in order to break away from the image she created from her 1960s musicals. In interviews, Hathaway said that doing family-friendly films didn't mean she was similar to their characters or mean she objected to appearing nude in other films.
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  • Matthew McConaughey

    Matthew McConaugheyBaker Dill

  • Jason Clarke

    Jason ClarkeFrank Zariakas

    Jason Clarke is an Australian actor, known for often being cast in antagonist roles in feature films. In 1969, Clarke was born in Winton, Queensland, a small town where the main industries are sheep and cattle raising. Winton was established as a township in 1879, but its main claim to fame are a number of dinosaur fossils located within the town's limits. Clarke was the son of a sheep shearer, bud decided to follow an acting career instead. By 1995, the 26-year-old Clarke had started appearing in small parts in various television series. He then started appearing as an extra in films. His early film appearances included the action comedy "Wanted" (1997), the action film "Dilemma" (1997), and the neo-noir crime drama "Twilight" (1998). Clarke had a more substantial role in the crime comedy "Our Lips are Sealed" (2000), where he played the assassin Mac. Clarke returned to playing small roles in films such as the period drama "Rabbit-Proof Fence" (2002) and the serial killer-themed black comedy "You Can't Stop the Murders" (2003). Clarke had a breakthrough television role as the co-star of the crime drama television series "Brotherhood" (2006-2008). In the series, Clarke played career politician Tommy Caffee, who has a complex relationship with his brother, the Irish-mob employed gangster Michael Caffee (played by Jason Isaacs). The series was loosely based on the lives of two real-life brothers with different careers, the Democratic politician and academic William Bulger (1934-) and the crime boss Whitey Bulger (1929-2018). The series won much critical praise for Clarke, though some critics disliked its humorless approach to its subject matter. In 2008, Clarke played the leading role of Howard Ferp in the live-action short film "Hole in the Paper Sky". In the film, Howard is a lonely misanthrope. He finds himself feeling genuine affection for a dog, which is used as a laboratory animal. The short film won awards by the Beverly Hills Film Festival and the Florida Film Festival. Also in 2008, Clarke played T. Ulrich, one of the main villains in the action thriller film "Death Race". In 2009, Clarke portrayed the Canadian gangster John "Red" Hamilton (1899-1934) in the crime drama film "Public Enemies". The film was an adaptation of the non-fiction book "Public Enemies: America's Greatest Crime Wave and the Birth of the FBI, 1933-34", which depicted the lives and deaths of a number of professional criminals during the Great Depression. Clarke next had a small role in the drama film "Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps" (2010), as the New York Fed Chief. The film was a sequel to the drama film "Wall Street", and depicted the financial crisis of 2007-2008. Clarke also played the role of FBI agent Doug Tate in the thriller film "Trust" (2010), which focused on the relationship between a teenage girl and an online predator. In 2011, Clarke played the abusive father Gordon O'Hara in the drama film "Yelling to the Sky". In 2011, the film was nominated for the Golden Bear award at the Berlin International Film Festival, but lost the award to the Iranian drama film "A Separation". Clarke also played the police officer Frank in the neo-noir thriller "Swerve" (2011). Finally, in 2011, Clarke gained another leading role in television. He played the Polish-American homicide detective Jarek Wysocki in the short-lived police procedural series "The Chicago Code" (February-May, 2011). In the series, Jarek is the leader of a special unit of the Chicago Police Department, which investigates political corruption, and the connections between Chigago politicians and organized crime. In 2012, Clarke played moonshine smuggler Howard Bondurant in the crime-drama film "Lawless". The film was an adaptation of the historical novel "The Wettest County in the World" by Matt Bondurant, and depicts the lives of moonshine smugglers in Virginia from 1931 to 1933. The film was nominated for the Palme d'Or (Golden Palm) award at the 2012 Cannes Film Festival, but lost the award to the French-language romantic tragedy "Amour". Also in 2012, Clarke played the role of the CIA intelligence officer Dan in the thriller film "Zero Dark Thirty". The film depicted the then-recent assassination of Al-Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden (1957-2011) by personnel the United States Navy SEALs. The film earned about 133 million dollars at the worldwide box office. and was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture. Clarke himself was nominated for the "Chicago Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Actor" for his role in the film. But the award for that year was instead won by rival actor Philip Seymour Hoffman (1967-2014). In 2013, Clarke played the mechanic George Wilson in the romantic drama "The Great Gatsby", an adaptation of the novel "The Great Gatsby" by Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald (1896-1940). Also in 2013, Clarke played the mercenary leader Emil Stenz in the action thriller "White House Down". In 2014, Clarke played the illiterate farmer and carpenter Thomas Lincoln (1778-1851) in the historical film "The Better Angels". Thomas was the father of politician Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), and the film focuses on the family life of the Lincoln family in Indiana from 1817 to 1821. Clarke also played a prominent role in the science fiction film "Dawn of the Planet of the Apes" (2014), cast as Malcolm, a human friend of the apes' leader Caesar (played by Andy Serkis). In 2015, Clarke gained the main cast role of John Connor in the science-fiction film "Terminator Genisys", the fifth film of "The Terminator" franchise. John Connor is the main protagonist of the franchise, and had previously been played (at various ages of his life) by the actors Dalton Abbot, Edward Furlong, Michael Edwards, Nick Stahl, Christian Bale, John De Vito, and Thomas Dekker. The film gained about 441 million dollars at the worldwide box office, becoming the second-most lucrative film in "The Terminator" franchise, following "Terminator 2: Judgment Day" (1991). Also in 2015, Clarke played the mountaineer Rob Hall (1961-1996) in the biographical film "Everest". The film was based on the 1996 Mount Everest disaster, when 8 mountaineers were killed in a blizzard on Mount Everest. Most of them had successfully climbed on the summit of the mountain, but were caught in the blizzard while attempting to descend from the summit. Hall was the most experienced mountaineer among them, as he had reached the summit of Everest five times (a record for non-Sherpa mountaineers). The film earned abut 203 million dollars at the worldwide box office. In 2016, Clarke played the ambiguous role of James in the psychological drama "All I See Is You". In 2017, Clarke returned to playing leading roles in historical films. He portrayed Reinhard Heydrich (1904-1942), the Director of the Reich Main Security Office (term 1939-1942) in "The Man with the Iron Heart", and Ted Kennedy (1932-2009), the United States Senator from Massachusetts (term 1962-2009) in "Chappaquiddick". The first film focused on "Operation Anthropoid" (1942), the successful assassination of Heydrich by Czechoslovak exiled soldiers, who were trained and equipped by the Special Operations Executive (1940-1946) of the United Kingdom. The second film focuses on the Chappaquiddick incident of 1969, when Kennedy's negligence during and after a single-vehicle car accident caused the death of political campaign specialist Mary Jo Kopechne (1940-1969). Kennedy was driving the vehicle with Kopechne as a passenger. The accident trapped Kopechne inside the submerged vehicle, but Kennedy did not try to help her and only reported the accident to the police 10 hours later. Kennedy received a two-month suspended jail sentence for his role in the incident. Also in 2017, Clarke played the role of Henry McAllan in the period drama "Mudbound". Henry is depicted as a farmer living in near poverty in Mississippi during the late 1930s and 1940s, while having to care for an aging father who is a bigoted member of the local Ku Klux Klan, and for a war veteran brother who is suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder. The film was nominated for a "Satellite Award for Best Film", but the award for that year was instead shared by the films "God's Own Country" and "Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri". In 2018, Clarke played the supporting role of Dr. Eric Price in the horror film "Winchester". The film presents a fictionalized account of the life of Sarah Winchester (1839-1922), co-owner of the Winchester Repeating Arms Company, and her survival in the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. Also in 2018, Clarke played astronaut Ed White (1930-1967) in the historical film "First Man", which depicted the Space Race of the 1960s. The historical White was the first American to walk in space (in a June, 1965 space mission), and the second person to manage to do so following the Soviet cosmonaut Alexei Leonov (1934-) (who performed the original space walk in March, 1965). In 2019, Clarke played the abusive stepfather Frank Zariakas in the neo-noir thriller "Serenity", the British colonel Lewis Morgan in the war-themed drama "The Aftermath", and Dr. Louis Creed in the resurrection-themed horror film "Pet Sematary". By 2019, Clarke was 50-years-old, but he was busier than ever in appearing in more film productions.
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  • Djimon Hounsou

    Djimon HounsouDuke

    Djimon Hounsou was born in Cotonou, Benin, in west Africa, to Albertine and Pierre Hounsou, a cook. He moved to Lyon, France, when he was thirteen. Hounsou has graced the catwalks of Paris and London as a popular male model. He has since left his modeling career and has worked on Gladiator (2000) by Ridley Scott and Amistad (1997) by Steven Spielberg.
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  • Diane Lane

    Diane LaneConstance

    Diane Lane was born on January 22, 1965, in New York. She is the daughter of acting coach Burton Eugene "Burt" Lane and nightclub singer/centerfold Colleen Farrington. Her parents' families were both from the state of Georgia. Diane was acting from a very young age and made her stage debut at the age of six. Her work in such acclaimed theater productions as "The Cherry Orchard" and "Medea" led to her being called to Hollywood. She was 13 when she was cast by director George Roy Hill in his wonderful 1979 film A Little Romance (1979), opposite Sir Laurence Olivier. The film only did so-so commercially, but Olivier praised his young co-star, calling her the new Grace Kelly. After her well-received debut, Diane found herself on magazine covers all over the world, including "Time", which declared her the "new young acting sensation". However, things quietened down a bit when she found herself in such critical and financial flops as Touched by Love (1980), Cattle Annie and Little Britches (1981), Movie Madness (1982), Ladies and Gentlemen, the Fabulous Stains (1982) and, most unmemorably, Six Pack (1982), all of which failed to set her career on fire. She also made several TV movies during this period, but it was in 1983 that she finally began to fulfill the promise of stardom that had earlier been predicted for her. Acclaimed director Francis Ford Coppola took note of Diane's appeal and cast her in two "youth"-oriented films based on S.E. Hinton novels. Indeed, Rumble Fish (1983) and The Outsiders (1983) have become cult classics and resulted in her getting a loyal fan base. The industry was now taking notice of Diane Lane, and she soon secured lead roles in three big-budget studio epics. She turned down the first, Splash (1984) (which was a surprise hit for Daryl Hannah). Unfortunately, the other two were critical and box-office bombs: Walter Hill's glossy rock 'n' roll fable Streets of Fire (1984) was not the huge summer success that many had thought it would be, and the massively troubled Coppola epic The Cotton Club (1984) co-starring Richard Gere was also a high-profile flop. The back-to-back failure of both of these films could have ended her career there and then -- but thankfully it didn't. Possibly "burned out" by the lambasting these films received and unhappy with the direction her career was taking, she "retired" from the film business at age 19, saying that she had forgotten what she had started acting for. She stayed away from the screen for the next three years. Ironically, the two films that were the main causes of her "retirement" have since grown in popularity, and "Streets of Fire" especially seems to have found the kind of audience it couldn't get when it was first released. The process of rebuilding her career was a slow and gradual one. First came the obscure and very sexy straight-to-video thriller Lady Beware (1987), followed by the critically acclaimed but little seen The Big Town (1987) with Matt Dillon and Tommy Lee Jones. In the former, Diane plays a very mysterious and sexy stripper and her memorable strip sequence is a highlight of the film. Despite her sexy new on-screen image, it wasn't until 1989's smash hit TV mini-series Lonesome Dove (1989) that Diane made another big impression on a sizable audience. Her performance in the hugely popular and critically acclaimed western epic as a vulnerable "whore with a heart" won her an Emmy nomination and much praise. Film producers were interested in her again. Another well-received TV production, Descending Angel (1990), was followed by smaller roles in major films like Richard Attenborough's Chaplin (1992) and Mike Binder's Indian Summer (1993), and larger parts in small independent films like My New Gun (1992), Vital Signs (1990) and Knight Moves (1992). Indeed, the latter two films co-starred her then-husband, Christopher Lambert, with whom she had a daughter named Eleanor. Diane was now re-established in Hollywood and started to appear in higher-profile co-starring roles in some big-budget, major movies like Walter Hill's Wild Bill (1995), the Sylvester Stallone actioner Judge Dredd (1995), the Robin Williams's comedy Jack (1996) and Murder at 1600 (1997) co-starring Wesley Snipes. However, all of these still did not quite make Diane a "big-name star" and, by 1997, she found herself, possibly by choice, back in smaller, personal projects. Her next role as a frustrated 1960s housewife in the independent hit A Walk on the Moon (1999) deservedly won her rave notices and, at last, gave her career the big lift it needed. The cute but tear-jerking comedy My Dog Skip (2000) also proved to be a small-scale success. However, it was the £330-million worldwide grossing blockbuster hit The Perfect Storm (2000) that finally made Diane Lane the household name that she always should have been. After the worldwide success of "The Perfect Storm", she was more in demand than ever. She played Leelee Sobieski's sinister junkie guardian in the slick thriller The Glass House (2001), and co-starred with Keanu Reeves in the #1 smash hit Hardball (2001). However, her greatest career moment was still to come with her lead role in the enormous critical and commercial hit Unfaithful (2002), in which she superbly portrayed Richard Gere's adulterous wife. Her performance won the respect of critics and audiences alike, as well as many awards and nominations including Best Actress Oscar and Golden Globe nominations. Her follow-up films including Under the Tuscan Sun (2003), Must Love Dogs (2005), Hollywoodland (2006), Secretariat (2010), and the blockbuster, Man of Steel (2013), were all received and her performances were highly praised. She won further Best Actress Golden Globe nominations for her roles in Under the Tuscan Sun (2003) and Cinema Verite (2011). She is very well regarded within the industry, adored by film fans, and has a credibility and quality that is all too rare today. Her immense talent at playing human and real characters, her "drop dead gorgeous" beauty and down-to-earth grittiness guarantees that she will stay on top, and she guarantee has already shown the kind of resilience that will keep her working for a long, long time.
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  • JEREMY STRONG

    JEREMY STRONGReid Miller

    Film work includes Molly's Game, Detroit, The Big Short, The Judge, Selma, Parkland, Lincoln, Zero Dark Thirty. Theater work includes A Man For All Seasons on Broadway and extensive work Off Broadway. Jeremy was recipient of the Lincoln Center Theater Annenberg Fellowship. He studied at Yale, The Royal Academy of Dramatic Art in London and with Chicago's Steppenwolf Theatre Company. He lives in New York with his wife Emma.
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Cast & Crew photos provided by TMDb.