Time Runs Out

John David Washington is the new Protagonist in Christopher Nolan’s original sci-fi action spectacle “Tenet.” Armed with only one word—Tenet—and fighting for the survival of the entire world, the Protagonist journeys through a twilight world of international espionage on a mission that will unfold in something beyond real time. Not time travel. Inversion. The international cast of “Tenet” also includes Robert Pattinson, Elizabeth Debicki, Dimple Kapadia, Aaron Taylor-Johnson, Clémence Poésy, with Michael Caine and Kenneth Branagh. Nolan wrote and directed the film, utilizing a mixture of IMAX® and 70mm film to bring the story to the screen. “Tenet” is produced by Emma Thomas and Nolan. Thomas Hayslip served as executive producer. Nolan’s behind-the-scenes creative team included director of photography Hoyte van Hoytema, production designer Nathan Crowley, editor Jennifer Lame, costume designer Jeffrey Kurland, visual effects supervisor Andrew Jackson, and special effects supervisor Scott Fisher. The score is composed by Ludwig Göransson. “Tenet” was filmed on location across seven countries. Warner Bros. Pictures presents a Syncopy Production, a Film by Christopher Nolan, “Tenet.” Warner Bros. Pictures is distributing “Tenet” worldwide and has slated the film for a July 17, 2020 release.

  • Jul 17, 2020
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Cast & Crew

  • CLEMENCE POESYActor

  • Kenneth BranaghActor

    Kenneth Charles Branagh was born on December 10, 1960, in Belfast, Northern Ireland, to parents William Branagh, a plumber and carpenter, and Frances (Harper), both born in 1930. He has two siblings, William Branagh, Jr. (born 1955) and Joyce Branagh (born 1970). When he was nine, his family escaped The Troubles by moving to Reading, Berkshire, England. At 23, Branagh joined the Royal Shakespeare Company, where he took on starring roles in "Henry V" and "Romeo and Juliet". He soon found the RSC too large and impersonal and formed his own, the Renaissance Theatre Company, which now counts Prince Charles as one of its royal patrons. At 29, he directed Henry V (1989), where he also co-starred with his then-wife, Emma Thompson. The film brought him Best Actor and Best Director Oscar nominations. In 1993, he brought Shakespeare to mainstream audiences again with his hit adaptation of Much Ado About Nothing (1993), which featured an all-star cast that included, among others, Denzel Washington, Michael Keaton and Keanu Reeves. At 30, he published his autobiography and, at 34, he directed and starred as "Victor Frankenstein" in the big-budget adaptation of Mary Shelley's novel, Mary Shelley's Frankenstein (1994), with Robert De Niro as the monster himself. In 1996, Branagh wrote, directed and starred in a lavish adaptation of Hamlet (1996). His superb film acting work also includes a wide range of roles such as in Celebrity (1998), Wild Wild West (1999), The Road to El Dorado (2000), Valkyrie (2008) and his stunning portrayal of Laurence Olivier in My Week with Marilyn (2011), where once again he offered a great performance that was also nominated for an Academy Award.
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  • Michael CaineActor

    Michael Caine was born on March 14, 1933 in Rotherhithe, London, England as Maurice Joseph Micklewhite. He is an actor and producer, known for The Prestige (2006), The Dark Knight (2008) and The Cider House Rules (1999). He has been married to Shakira Caine since January 8, 1973. They have one child. He was previously married to Patricia Haines.
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  • Robert PattinsonActor

    Robert Douglas Thomas Pattinson was born May 13, 1986 in London, England, to Richard Pattinson, a car dealer importing vintage cars, and Clare Pattinson (née Charlton), who worked as a booker at a model agency. He grew up in Barnes, southwest London with two older sisters. Robert discovered his love for music long before acting and started learning the guitar and piano at the age of four. He became a big cinephile for love of auteur cinema in his early teens and preferred to watch films rather than doing his homework. In his late teens and early twenties, he used to perform solo acoustic guitar gigs at open mic nights in bars and pubs around London where he sung his own written songs. Thinking about becoming a musician or going to university to study speech-writing, he never thought about pursuing an acting career and his drama teacher in school even advised him not to join the drama club because she thought he wasn't made for the creative subjects. But as a teenager, he joined the local amateur theatre club after his father convinced him to attend because he was quite shy. At age 15 and after two years of working backstage, he auditioned for the play 'Guys and Dolls' and he got his first role as a Cuban dancer with no lines. He got the lead part in the next play 'Our Town', was spotted by a talent agent who was sitting in the audience and he began looking for professional roles. His first screen role was a small part in Vanity Fair (2004), but he'd been cut out of the final film and didn't know about it until he attended the premiere. The casting director felt so guilty for not telling him, that she got him the audition for Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (2005). He was lucky and succeeded in gaining the role of Cedric Diggory, which brought him to a wider audience at the age of 19 and he continued to star in mostly smaller British TV productions. Hollywood expressed only mild interest in him and he was still debating whether or not he wished to pursue acting. Throughout that period, Pattinson would occasionally send audition tapes for roles in America. One, for a rom-com, led to the opportunity for an in-person audition in Los Angeles. That audition did not pan out, but while in town he went in for another, with Thirteen (2003) director Catherine Hardwicke, for a part in what he understood to be an indie movie based on a low-profile book about a vampire. Being the last one out of 3000 male actors to audition for the part, the role of Edward Cullen in the film adaptations of the Twilight novels written by Stephenie Meyer brought him to unexpected worldwide stardom at age 22 and the five films between 2008 and 2012 grossed over $3.3 billion in worldwide receipts. Between the Twilight Saga films, he also starred in Remember Me (2010), Water for Elephants (2011) and Bel Ami (2012). Pattinson's Twilight-era was surreal. He had been catapulted onto Hollywood's A-list as a heartthrob, but also experienced certain preconceptions about what he wanted - or was capable of doing - as an actor. That changed with an unexpected straight offer from auteur director David Cronenberg to star in Cosmopolis (2012), which he described as an eye-opening experience: It reminded him of his love for cinema, why he wanted to become an actor in the first place and solidified his foremost desire for the coming years to work with great filmmakers. With Pattinson being a big cinephile, he since then starred in mostly independent films from respected auteur directors, such as The Rover (2014), Maps to the Stars (2014), Life (2015), Queen of the Desert (2015) and The Childhood of a Leader (2015). His unrecognizable role as an explorer in the amazon jungle in The Lost City of Z (2016) from director James Gray brought him much critical acclaim. His transformation to a sleazy, manic conman in the gritty crime thriller Good Time (2017) earned a six-minute standing ovation at the Cannes Film Festival and brought him a nomination for Best Actor at the Independent Spirit Awards. It was a major step for his transition into a character actor with incredible range, with critics calling his performance a revelation and career-defining. He starred in the western-comedy Damsel (2018) as a cowboy with sociopathic characteristics and played a convict sent to space for sexual experimentation in the psychological mystery drama High Life (2018) from acclaimed French auteur director Claire Denis. He returned to work with director David Michôd in The King (2019) and starred in the black-and-white fantasy-horror movie The Lighthouse (2019) from director Robert Eggers, which earned him his second Independent Spirit Award nomination for Best Actor.
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  • Elizabeth DebickiActor

    Debicki was born in Paris, to a Polish father and an Australian mother of Irish descent, who were both dancers. When she was five, the family moved to Melbourne, where she grew up with two younger siblings. She became interested in ballet at an early age and trained as a dancer until deciding to switch to theatre. A student at Huntingtower School in Melbourne's east, Debicki achieved two perfect study scores in Drama and English and was the school's dux when she graduated in 2007. In 2010, she completed a degree in drama at the University of Melbourne's Victorian College of the Arts. In August 2009, she was the recipient of a Richard Pratt Bursary for outstanding acting students in their second year of training.
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  • Aaron Taylor-JohnsonJunior

    Aaron Taylor-Johnson is an English stage, television, and film actor. He was born Aaron Perry Johnson in High Wycombe, Buckinghamshire, to Sarah and Robert Johnson, a civil engineer. He has a sister, Gemma Johnson, who had a small role in his movie Tom & Thomas (2002). Aaron is of English-Russian Jewish descent. He began performing at age six, appearing in plays like Macbeth and All My Sons. He worked frequently on television as a young actor, having roles in the TV films The Apocalypse (2000), Behind Closed Doors (2003), The Best Man (2006), and Sherlock Holmes and the Baker Street Irregulars (2007), and series The Bill (1984), Family Business (2003), Feather Boy (2004), Casualty (1986), Talk to Me (2007), and Nearly Famous (2007). He made his feature debut in the British film Tom & Thomas (2002), where he played the dual title roles. His first American film was the sequel Shanghai Knights (2003), playing a child version of Charles Chaplin, and his early film credits also include Dead Cool (2004), The Thief Lord (2006), and The Illusionist (2006), where he played a young version of Edward Norton's character Eisenheim. Aaron became known in England after playing a leading role in the film Angus, Thongs and Perfect Snogging (2008), opposite Georgia Groome. He then co-starred with Carey Mulligan in the American drama The Greatest (2009), played John Lennon in the biography Nowhere Boy (2009), and had the lead role of a teenage would-be superhero, Dave Lizewski, in the action superhero riff Kick-Ass (2010), which introduced him to a wide American audience. After appearing in the thriller Chatroom (2010), Aaron had a large part in the Irish-set drama Albert Nobbs (2011), and co-starred with Taylor Kitsch and Blake Lively in Oliver Stone's California-based action-thriller Savages (2012). Also in 2012, he played Keira Knightley's character's forbidden love interest, Count Vronsky, in the adaptation Anna Karenina (2012), set in Russia. After reprising his role in the sequel Kick-Ass 2 (2013), Aaron had starring roles in his two biggest films to date, the blockbusters Godzilla (2014), as soldier Ford Brody, and Avengers: Age of Ultron (2015), as Pietro Maximoff (known as Quicksilver in the Marvel comic books). He first played Pietro in a mid-credits scene in Captain America: The Winter Soldier (2014). Next, he won a Golden Globe for Best Supporting Actor for his role as the shady Ray in the drama [linktt=4550098], and co-starred with John Cena in the war thriller The Wall (2017). While filming Nowhere Boy (2009), Aaron began a relationship with the film's director, artist Sam Taylor-Wood. The two married in 2012, and blended their surnames together. Aaron began being credited as Aaron Taylor-Johnson, while Sam became known as Sam Taylor-Johnson. The couple has two children together, and Aaron is also stepfather to Sam's two daughters from her previous marriage.
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